Frequently Asked Questions

Why does my B.C. Resident credential expire?

To ensure that only B.C. residents are accessing hunting privileges available to residents only, the Province introduced a policy that requires hunters to prove residency every 3 years.


What happens when my B.C. Resident credential expires?

You will not be able to purchase hunting licences or limited entry hunting applications until you re-establish your residency.


What happens if my B.C. Resident credential expires while I am out hunting?

If your residency credential expires while you are in the field and you get checked by an Officer, you may use your B.C. identification to confirm your residency. However, you will be advised to re-establish your residency in the electronic hunting system as soon as possible.


How do I know when my B.C. Resident credential will expire?​

Your Fish and Wildlife profile shows your B.C. Resident credential expiry date. You can check the expiry date by logging on to the BC Hunting Online service, or by asking at a FrontCounter BC, Service BC, or hunting vendor location.


How do I renew my B.C. Resident credential?​

You can renew your B.C. Resident credential online using the BC Hunting online service, or in person at any Service BC or FrontCounter BC office. For help using the online system, view the quick reference guide on how to renew your B.C. Resident credential (PDF, 318KB).


What kind of identification do I need to renew my B.C. Resident credential?​

You will need to show a valid BC Driver’s Licence, BCID card, BC Services Card, or a combined BC Driver's Licence and Services Card.

How do electronic-based hunting licences work?

When you buy a licence, the licence information will be entered into your online Fish and Wildlife ID (FWID) profile. Only species licences will continue to be paper-based. Non-species licences don't have a paper version.


Which hunting licences are electronic?

Resident, non-resident and non-resident alien hunting licences, initiation licence, youth licence, upland game bird licence, special area licences (Gulf Islands and Fraser Valley) and guide outfitter licences.


Do I have to I buy my licences online?

No. If you don’t want to buy online, you can buy your licences at Service BC, FrontCounter BC or participating vendor locations.


How do I provide proof to a conservation officer that I have a licence?​

You must be able to produce your FWID number and photo ID upon request of an officer. Conservation officers will have access to your Fish and Wildlife profile, credentials, licences and Limited Entry Hunting authorizations on their iPhone or in-car computer. Your species licences will also have a barcode that can be scanned, allowing the conservation officer to verify that your species licence is valid.


Do I need to carry a paper version of my electronic licence while hunting?

No. There is no paper version of your electronic hunting licence. However, you must carry all of your species licences for the applicable licence year, including both cancelled and uncancelled species licences, while hunting, and must cancel the licence by notching it as soon as you harvest an animal.


Do I need to carry an electronic version of my licences on a phone or mobile device?​

No. The electronic-based hunting licences will be visible on your Fish and Wildlife profile, but you don’t need to have access to your profile while hunting. Conservation officers will be able to view your Fish and Wildlife profile on their mobile devices to check your credentials, licences and LEH authorizations.


Why do species licences have a paper component, when the other licences don’t?​

Each species licence is good for one harvest only. By immediately notching the paper licence after harvesting an animal, you provide proof that you have used the licence for one harvest. The licence can’t be used again.


How does a species licence get cancelled in the system after an animal is harvested?

The species licence is not cancelled in the system. Hunters are required to notch the paper species licence to cancel it immediately following the harvest of an animal.


How can I prove that I bought a licence?

Your licences will be visible on your Fish and Wildlife profile. If you buy your licences at a vendor, Service BC or FrontCounter BC location, you’ll be given a receipt that will include each licence you bought, and the licence number. If you buy online, you can print or view your receipt at any time. You don’t need to carry this receipt when you’re hunting, but it’s proof that you have bought licences.


What are non-species licences?

Non-species licences include the resident, non-resident and non-resident alien hunting licence, special area hunting licences (Gulf Islands and Fraser Valley), initiation licence, youth licence and upland game bird licence.


Can I print any of my hunting licences?

No. Licences are not printable from the online system.


How will I get my species licence if I buy it online?​

If you buy your species licence online, it will be mailed to you.


If I buy my species licences online, can I pick them up at my local vendor, or other location?

No. If you buy your species licences online, they will be mailed to you. If you want to hunt within a few days of buying your species licence, you should buy them at a vendor, Service BC or FrontCounter BC.


If I buy a species licence at Service BC, FrontCounter BC, or a vendor, will I get it right away?

Yes.


Can I buy hunting licences for my children through the BC Hunting online service?​

Yes.


Do I have to provide an acknowledgement of responsibility when I buy a licence for a child?​

Yes, if you are buying a resident hunting licence or youth licence for a child. You don’t need to provide an acknowledgement of responsibility if you buy species licences on behalf of your child.


What happens if I lose my species licence?

You can get a replacement licence at Service BC or FrontCounter BC.

How do I find out if I'm eligible for a Permit to Accompany?

Hunting in BC contains a full list of eligibility requirements..


How do I apply for my Permit to Accompany online?

You can apply online for your Permit to Accompany (you will need a valid credit card for payment), and monitor the progress of your application from any computer with internet access.


What does a Permit to Accompany cost?

The permit Fee is $55.00, including the Habitat Conservation Trust Fund surcharge, and are payable at the time of application. Applications will not be processed until the fee has been paid.


What do I need to apply?

You will need to provide information about the person(s) you will be accompanying, when you will be hunting (no more than 21 consecutive days), the Region you will be hunting in and what species you will be hunting.  Hunting in BC has further details.


What credentials does the person I'm accompanying need?

Anyone who wishes to buy a hunting licence in B.C. must have a Fish & Wildlife ID, with verified user status and the appropriate credentials. The non-resident/alien to be accompanied needs to self-register for a FWID and apply for credentials.  Each non-resident or non-resident alien hunter will need to provide a copy of the appropriate identity documentation:

  • Non-residents – Proof of Canadian citizenship or permanent residency status, proof of age
  • Non-resident aliens – proof of age
  • Anyone requiring a hunting credential – Proof of hunter safety training

Hunting in BC has more information on acceptable documentation.


How long does it take to process FWID registration requests?

It can take up to 3 days to review and approve online FWID registration requests. If you need immediate assistance, visit any Service BC or FrontCounter BC location.


How long does it take to process the Permit to Accompany application?​

The target time frame for the processing of your application is 30 days from the date your application is received.


What happens after I apply?

Your application will be reviewed to ensure that it is complete.  If necessary, you will be contacted for more information. A decision will be made on whether to issue a permit or not, and once the status of your application changes you will be notified by email to log in to your Fish and Wildlife profile.


Where do I get a copy of my approved Permit to Accompany?

You can download and print the permit online, or visit a Service BC or FrontCounter BC office and request a copy be printed.


How do I make changes to my approved Permit to Accompany?

You will need to contact a FrontCounter BC office and request an amendment.  A fee will be charged, and must be paid before the amendment process can continue.


How do I provide proof to a conservation officer that I have a Permit to Accompany?

You will need to produce photo ID and your FWID number upon request of an officer. Conservation officers will have access to your Fish and Wildlife profile and permit details on their mobile devices in the field or in-car computer.


Can I buy non-resident hunting and species licences online on behalf of the persons I will be accompanying?

Yes for non-resident or non-resident adults only. Before you can buy a licence for persons named on your permit, they must have a Fish & Wildlife ID and the appropriate credentials required to hunt in B.C. For youth named on a permit to accompany, a parent or guardian must first purchase the youth licence or the non-resident or non-resident alien hunting licence. A permit to accompany holder can then buy species licences on behalf of a youth named on a valid permit to accompany.


Do I have to buy licences online?

No. You can purchase non-resident licences at any FrontCounter BC or Service BC location. If you buy species licences in-person, you will receive them immediately.


If I buy the species licences online for the person(s) being accompanied, can I pick them up at an over the counter location?

No.  Species licences bought online will be mailed. You can choose to have them mailed directly to you or to a Canadian address for the person(s) being accompanied. Species licences can only be mailed to an address within Canada. Species licences will be delivered approximately within 14 days to any address in B.C. Delivery times outside of B.C. may take longer.


What happens after the hunt?

A completed permit to accompany report must be submitted no later than ten days after the Hunt End Date stated on the permit to accompany, regardless of whether the hunt took place or not. The permit to accompany report requests information about both hunting effort and harvest. The permit to accompany report can be submitted through BC Hunting Online, or over the counter at a FrontCounter BC office. Royalty Fees must be paid within 30 days after the hunt end date if there was a successful harvest subject to royalties. Royalty fees are calculated and an invoice generated upon submission of the permit to accompany report. Reports and invoices are both available on you Fish and Wildlife profile. Royalty fees for permit to accompany reports submitted through BC Hunting online can be paid using the online service, or over the counter at a Service BC or FrontCounter BC office.


Is a paper permit to accompany report still available?

No. The permit to accompany report must now be submitted electronically through BC Hunting Online, or over the counter at a FrontCounter BC office.

Do I have to buy my licences online?

No. If you don’t want to buy your licences online, you can still buy your licences at a Service BC or FrontCounter BC location.


Can I print any of my hunting licences?

All licences are electronic, with the exception of a species licence, which continues to have a paper version of the licence that must be carried while hunting.  Therefore, there is no need to print a licence so hunting licences are not printable by the electronic system.


Do I need to carry a paper version of my hunting licence while hunting?

You must carry all species licences obtained or held for the current year, including both cancelled and uncancelled, and cancel the species licence by notching it as soon as you harvest an animal. Otherwise, no, there won’t be a paper version of your hunting licences.


Can I print my species licence?

No. Species licences are printed on special paper and contain unique numbers. If you buy a species licence online, it will be mailed to you. If you buy the species licence at a FrontCounter BC or Service BC office you will obtain your licence immediately.


Do I need to carry an electronic version of my licences on a phone or mobile device?

No. Your electronic hunting licences will be visible on your Fish and Wildlife profile, but you don’t need to have access to your profile while hunting. You will need to produce photo ID and your FWID number upon request of an officer. Conservation officers will be able to view your Fish and Wildlife profile on their mobile devices to check your credentials and licences.


I am a non-resident or non-resident alien hunter and want to hunt small game, including upland game birds, in B.C. but do not want to hire a guide outfitter or an assistant guide employed by a guide outfitter.  Which licences do I require?

To hunt small game unaccompanied, you will need to apply for and obtain an unrestricted non-resident hunting licence or unrestricted non-resident alien hunting licence along with an upland game bird licence.


I am a non-resident or non-resident alien hunter and want to hunt migratory birds such as ducks and geese, in B.C. but do not want to hire a guide outfitter or an assistant guide employed by a guide outfitter.  Which licences do I require?

Migratory birds are regulated by the federal government and are classified as small game in B.C.  To hunt migratory birds unaccompanied, you will need to apply for and obtain an unrestricted non-resident hunting licence or unrestricted non-resident alien hunting licence along with any other federal government requirements for hunting migratory birds.


I am a non-resident or non- resident alien hunter and want to purchase an unrestricted non-resident hunting licence or unrestricted non-resident alien hunting licence, what do I need?

You willl need to obtain a hunting credential in the BC Hunting Online system by proving successful completion of hunter safety training.


Are the fees different for an unrestricted versus restricted non-resident or non-resident alien hunting licence?

The fee for a non-resident hunting licence (unrestricted or restricted) is $75.00 and for a non-resident alien hunting licence (unrestricted or restricted), $180.00.


If I hold an unrestricted non-resident or non-resident alien hunting licence, am I allowed to hunt big game unaccompanied?

No, when hunting big game species in B.C., all non-resident or non-resident alien hunters must be accompanied by: a licensed guide outfitter, an assistant guide employed by a licensed guide outfitter, or a person who holds a permit to accompany the non-resident or non-resident alien hunter.


How will I provide proof to a conservation officer that I have a licence?

Conservation officers will have access to your Fish and Wildlife profile, credentials and licences on their iPhone or in-car computer. Your species licences will also have a barcode that can be scanned, allowing the conservation officer to verify that your species licence is valid.


How can I prove that I bought a licence?

Your licences will be visible on your Fish and Wildlife profile. If you buy your licences at a Service BC or a FrontCounter BC location, you’ll be given a receipt that will include each licence you bought, and the licence number. If you buy online, you can print, save or view your receipt at any time. You don’t need to carry this receipt when you’re hunting, but it’s proof that you have bought licences.


Why do species licences have a paper component, when the other licences don’t?

Each species licence is good for one harvest only. There is a legal requirement under the Wildlife Act to notch the applicable species licences immediately upon a harvest. By notching the paper licence after harvesting an animal, you provide proof of legal harvest, and the cancelled licence can’t be used again. Please note that you must carry species licences obtained or held for the current year, including both cancelled and uncancelled.


How does a species licence get cancelled in the system after an animal has been harvested?

Species licences are cancelled in the system when the harvest is reported by a guide outfitter through their guide outfitter report. Hunters are also required to notch the paper species licence to provide proof of legal harvest.


What happens if I lose my species licence?

You can get a replacement licence at Service BC or FrontCounter BC.


If I buy my species licences online, can I pick them up at a Service BC or FrontCounter BC office location?

No. If you buy your species licences online, they will be mailed to you. If you want to hunt within a few days of buying your species licence, you should buy them at a Service BC or FrontCounter BC office.


If I buy a species licence at Service BC or FrontCounter BC, will I get it right away?

Yes.


What are non-species licences?

Non-species licences include the resident hunting licence, the non-resident hunting licence, the non-resident alien hunting licence, special area hunting licences (Gulf Islands and Fraser Valley), initiation licence and youth licence.


Am I able to buy hunting licences for my children through the BC Hunting online service?

Yes.


Do I have to provide a written undertaking when I buy a licence for a child?

Yes, if you are buying a non-resident or non-resident alien hunting licence (unrestricted or restricted) on behalf of a youth or youth licence for a child you will have to provide a signed written undertaking. You don’t need to provide a written undertaking if you buy species licences on behalf of your child.

Guide outfitter licences

How do I apply for my Guide Outfitter Licence online?

You can apply for your Guide Outfitter licence using BC Hunting Online. For step-by-step instructions on submitting a Guide Outfitter Licence application, please refer to the Quick Reference Guide.


Can I use my Business BCeID to create a Fish and Wildlife ID and manage commercial activities?

Because of privacy concerns regarding individual Fish & Wildlife IDs and profiles, the Business BCeID cannot be used at this time to access the BC Hunting Online service.


When can I apply for a Guide Outfitter Licence?

Applications for the upcoming licence year typically open in January. Applicants are encouraged to submit their application early before the licence year begins in order to allow adequate time for processing.


How long does it take to process a Guide Outfitter Licence application?

There are many factors that can affect the length of time it takes to complete a guide outfitter licence application, including application type and region. Applicants are encouraged to start the process as soon as possible as applications can take several months to complete. 


How do I find out if I am eligible for a Guide Outfitter Licence?

A full list of eligibility requirements is available on the Guide Outfitter Licence section of our website.


Where do I get a copy of my approved Guide Outfitter Licence?

You can download and print your licence from BC Hunting Online.


How will I provide proof to a conservation officer that I have a valid Guide Outfitter Licence?

You can provide proof by producing a legible copy of your licence (electronic or hard copy) or stating your Fish and Wildlife ID number. Conservation officers will have access to your Fish and Wildlife ID profile and Guide Outfitter Licence details on their mobile devices in the field or in-car computer. 


Guide outfitter reports

How do I submit a guide outfitter report?

Guide outfitters, or designates for the guide outfitter, can submit guide outfitter reports electronically though BC Hunting Online. For step-by-step instructions on submitting guide outfitter reports online, please refer to the Quick Reference Guide

If you choose to use a paper form, you can submit it by mail to a FrontCounter BC office or to the Wildlife & Habitat Branch at: 

Wildlife & Habitat Branch
Guide Outfitter Reporting
PO Box 9391 Stn Prov Gov’t
Victoria, BC  V8W 9M3


When am I required to submit a guide outfitter report?

A guide outfitter report must be completed immediately after a hunt has concluded and submitted within 30 days.


What information needs to be reported on a guide outfitter report?

Guide outfitters must submit all details of the guided hunt including all hunting effort even if a harvest for the species did not occur. All fields on the form must be filled out. 


How do I give a copy of the report to my client if I submit online?

Upon submission of a guide outfitter report, a copy of the report will automatically be available on the guided hunter’s Fish and Wildlife ID profile. They will be able to log in to their account and view any reports related to their guided hunting activity. If you choose to use a paper form, you must provide a copy, either electronic or physical, to your client. 


What if I don’t have internet connectivity in the field to complete the report online immediately after the hunt?

For those guide outfitters who do not have internet connectivity, a fillable report form (PDF, 0.133MB) is available to meet the requirement of completing the report immediately after the hunt has concluded. The information recorded on the PDF can be submitted by you or a designate using BC Hunting Online within 30 days after the hunt is concluded.

If you need to use the fillable PDF guide outfitter report form, it is recommended to fill it out on a computer in order to record all the required information.


I noticed an error on a guide outfitter report after it was submitted. How do I fix it?

A report cannot be edited by the guide outfitter or designate after it has been submitted. If you notice an error or missing information, please contact FrontCounter BC at 1-877-855-3222.


How do I designate someone to submit guide outfitter reports on my behalf?

For step-by-step instructions on registering a designate online, please refer to the Quick Reference Guide (PDF, 0.219MB). You can also register a designate at any Service BC or FrontCounter BC office.


How do I remove someone from acting as a designate on my behalf?

You can remove designates or certain roles a designate can perform on your behalf at any time using BC Hunting Online by navigating to the Designates screen and selecting the designates name. You can also remove designates at any Service BC or FrontCounter BC office.


What happens if I do not submit my report as prescribed in regulation?

Failure to complete and submit a guide report is an offence. Failure to submit a report may lead to investigation and fines. The fine for failing to submit a report is $230.


Royalties

When will I be charged royalties?

Royalties are charged for wildlife harvested by guided non-resident and non-resident alien hunters. Immediately after online submission of a guide outfitter report of a harvest subject to royalty, an invoice will be generated for any royalties owing.


Who is responsible for paying royalties?

Guide outfitters are responsible for paying the royalties. 


When are royalty payments due?

Royalties charged for wildlife harvested by guided non-resident and non-resident alien hunters must be paid by March 31st of the year following the calendar year in which the harvest took place. 
Example 1: A non-resident harvested a deer in October 2019. The royalty payment is due by March 31, 2020.
Example 2: A non-resident harvested a deer in January 2020. The royalty payment is due by March 31, 2021.


How do I pay royalties?

Royalties can be paid through BC Hunting Online, or by mailing a cheque or money order payable to “Minister of Finance” to any FrontCounter BC office. In-person payment is also available at a Service BC or FrontCounter BC office. When submitting a guide outfitter report, you can choose to pay royalties at the time the report is submitted or to pay later. See the Quick Reference Guide (PDF, 0.219MB) for step-by-step instructions on paying for royalties online.


What happens if I do not pay my royalties on time?

It is an offense to fail to submit royalties. There is a legal requirement to pay royalties on time. If an overdue royalty exists, the guide outfitter’s ability to perform certain functions within the BC Hunting Online service will be limited. Failing to submit royalties may lead to a $575 fine and additional investigation. 


Register and buy licences for a client

How do I register my clients for a Fish & Wildlife ID?

You can register your clients for a Fish & Wildlife ID either online or at any Service BC or FrontCounter BC office. For step-by-step instructions on registering a client online, please refer to the Quick Reference Guides (PDF, 0.219MB).


How long does it take to process a new client registration?.

It can take up to 3 days to review and approve online Fish and Wildlife ID registration requests. If you need immediate assistance, please call the FrontCounter BC Contact Centre


Can I buy hunting licences online on behalf of my clients?

Yes. For step-by-step instructions on purchasing licences on behalf of a client, please refer to the Quick Reference Guides (PDF, 0.219MB). Before you can buy a licence for a client, they must have a Fish & Wildlife ID and the appropriate credentials required to hunt in B.C.  You can also register a designate to purchase licences for clients over the counter on your behalf.


Where can I buy licences on behalf of my clients?

You can buy hunting and species licences for all clients online using BC Hunting Online. You can also purchase licences for clients in person at FrontCounter BC, Service BC and Vendor* locations. 

*Not all vendor locations sell non-resident and non-resident alien licences. Please call ahead to confirm. 


If I buy my client's species licences online, can I pick them up at my local Service BC or FrontCounter BC office location?

No. Species licences bought online will be mailed. You can choose to have them mailed directly to you, or to another address within Canada. Species licences will be delivered within approximately 14 business days to any address in B.C. Delivery times outside of B.C. may take longer.


Does my client need anything from me to buy licences themselves?

You must provide your client with your Guide Outfitter Licence number in order for them to purchase licences themselves, either online or in person at a Service BC or FrontCounter BC office.

General

How long does it take to process a GTC application?

There are many factors that can affect the length of time it takes to complete a GTC application, including application type, complexity, and region. Holders are encouraged to start the process as soon as possible as applications can take several months to years to complete.


How do I change the agent listed on the GTC?

Contact the FrontCounter BC office in the region your GTC is located.  The FrontCounter BC permit clerk can begin the amendment process.


How do I make an administrative change (fix a spelling error, legal name change, etc.) on my GTC?

Contact the FrontCounter BC office in the region your GTC is located.  The FrontCounter BC permit clerk can begin the amendment process.


Renewals

How do I renew my GTC?

You can renew your GTC through BC Hunting Online by opening your existing GTC and selecting the Renew Certificate link. For step-by-step instructions on renewing a GTC, please refer to the Quick Reference Guide (PDF, 0.219MB). You can also renew your certificate in person at any FrontCounter BC office.


When can I renew my GTC?

When at least 3/5 (60%) of the term on your GTC has elapsed. For example, a holder of a GTC with a term of 10 years can start the renewal process after 6 years.


How much does it cost to renew a certificate?

There is no cost associated with renewing a GTC.


Transfers

What is a transfer of interest?

A transfer of interest occurs when there is a change in the holder(s) on the GTC or a change in the holder’s interest in the GTC. The GTC can be transferred to all new holders, or the transfer can be a change to the make-up of existing holders and their interest in the certificate.  A new certificate will be issued once the transfer process is complete.


What is a spatial transfer?

A spatial transfer occurs when there is a change to the spatial boundaries of the guiding area described in the GTC. This could occur when a portion of guiding area is sold to another holder and is transferred to a new GTC (split) or amalgamated with an existing GTC. Depending on the scenario, single or multiple new certificates could be issued.


How much does it cost to transfer a certificate?

The transfer cost is $500.


How do I change the holder(s) listed on the GTC?

Changing the holder(s) listed on a GTC is considered a transfer of interest.  You can change the holder(s) listed on the GTC through BC Hunting Online by opening your existing GTC and selecting the Transfer Certificate link. On step 1 of the transfer application process, select the Transfer Type as “Transfer of Interest”. If you are also changing the agent for the GTC, you will need to know the Fish and Wildlife ID of the agent receiving the new guiding territory. For step-by-step instructions on transferring a GTC, please refer to the Quick Reference Guide (PDF, 319KB).


How do I transfer the entire GTC to a new holder(s)?

You can transfer the entire GTC to a new holder(s) through BC Hunting Online. If you are also changing the agent for the GTC, you will need to know the Fish and Wildlife ID of the agent receiving the new guiding territory. In BC Hunting Online, open your existing GTC and select the Transfer Certificate link. On step 1 of the transfer application process, select the Transfer Type as “Transfer of Interest”. For step-by-step instructions on transferring a GTC, please refer to the Quick Reference Guide (PDF, 319KB).


How do I transfer a portion of land described on the GTC to another guiding territory?

You can request to split the land described in the metes and bounds of a GTC through BC Hunting Online. This is considered a spatial transfer. If you are transferring the portion(s) to new holder(s) and agent, you will need to know the Fish and Wildlife ID of the agent(s) receiving the new guiding territory and the holder details. If you are keeping the portion(s), you can remain the holder for the new GTCs. 

In BC Hunting Online, open your existing GTC and select the Transfer Certificate link.  On step 1 of the transfer application process, select the Transfer Type as “Spatial Transfer”. For step-by-step instructions on transferring a GTC, please refer to the Quick Reference Guide (PDF, 319KB).


How do I receive a portion of land described on a GTC to create a new guiding territory?

You can receive a portion of land described on a GTC through BC Hunting Online. There will be a new territory created and you will be the agent/holder. From your Fish and Wildlife ID home page, select Apply for Guiding Territory Certificate from the left menu. On step 2 of the application process, respond Yes to the question “Is this application a result of receiving a spatial transfer?” For step-by-step instructions on applying for a GTC, please refer to the Quick Reference Guide (PDF, 319KB).


How to I receive a portion of land described on a GTC to amalgamate with an existing GTC?

You can amalgamate a portion of land described on a GTC that you are receiving with an adjacent GTC that you currently hold through BC Hunting Online. From your Fish and Wildlife ID home page, select Apply for Guiding Territory Certificate from the left menu. On step 2 of the application process, respond Yes to the question “Is this application a result of receiving a spatial transfer?” For step-by-step instructions on applying for a GTC, please refer to the Quick Reference Guide.


Notice of corporate change

What is a notice of corporation change?

A notice of corporation change is used when there is a change in the control of a corporation that holds an interest in a GTC. This can include:

  • Certificate holder has amalgamated with another corporation
  • Control of certificate holder has changed, been acquired or disposed of
  • Control of corporation with control of certificate holder has changed, been acquired or disposed of

The application must be submitted no later than 30 days after the change in control. 


How do I notify for a change to the control of one of the corporations listed on the GTC?

You can update the GTC through BC Hunting Online if the corporation has changed its name or the voting shareholders have changed for the corporation on the GTC.  In BC Hunting Online, open your existing GTC and select the Corporate Change link. For step-by-step instructions on notifying of a corporation change on a GTC, please refer to the Quick Reference Guide (PDF, 319KB).


How much does it cost to report a notice of corporate change for a certificate?

The notice of corporate change cost is $500.

What is the harvest questionnaire?

The ‘harvest questionnaire’ is a survey that is sent to resident hunters each year and involves two surveys combined on one survey form. Those two surveys are: (1) the limited entry hunting (LEH) survey; and (2) the hunter sample survey.


What is the LEH survey?

The LEH survey is used to determine hunters’ LEH harvest and effort activities for all bison, elk, moose and mule deer LEH hunts.


What is the hunter sample survey?

The hunter sample survey is used to determine hunters’ combined general open season (GOS) and LEH harvest and effort activities for a variety of game species. Estimates of harvest and effort are generated for each wildlife management unit (WMU) and include combined LEH and GOS hunting (i.e. estimates of all hunting activities within each WMU for each species).


How is the list of survey species that appears on my harvest questionnaire determined?

The list of survey species appearing on a hunter’s harvest questionnaire is determined by random selection of the hunting licences that a hunter has purchased, plus their success in the LEH draw.


Who receives the LEH survey?

The Ministry will send any hunter who was successful in the LEH draw for bison, elk, moose or mule deer, a harvest questionnaire asking them about their LEH hunting activities for one or more of these species (e.g. if you received a bison and moose LEH authorization, you should receive a questionnaire for both species).


Who receives the hunter sample survey?

Any hunter who purchased a hunting licence is entered into the hunting licence pool and could be randomly selected to receive a harvest questionnaire for game bird and wolf. Any hunter who purchased a species licence is entered into the species licence pool and could be randomly selected to receive a harvest questionnaire for black bear, caribou, cougar, elk, moose, mountain goat, mountain sheep, mule deer or white-tailed deer.


I didn’t hunt wolf or game bird. Why did I get a wolf and game bird survey?

Wolf and game bird hunters are selected to receive a survey from the hunting licence pool because there is not a species licence for resident wolf or game bird. This means that some hunters will be sent a wolf and game bird survey even though they may not have hunted for these species. It is important that you respond to the survey even if you did not hunt.


Do I need to fill out the questionnaire if I did not hunt?

Yes. It is important for hunters to complete and return the entire questionnaire (all survey questions for each species), regardless of whether they hunted any or all of the species included on their questionnaire. Completely filling out and returning the questionnaire (regardless of whether a hunter ‘did’ or ‘did not’ hunt), provides essential data that's required to make better wildlife management decisions.


Can I submit my survey electronically?

Yes. Each paper survey has a website address and unique eight-digit login ID printed on the front page. If you wish to submit your survey electronically, please visit the 2020 Harvest Questionnaire and enter your eight-digit login ID.

Starting in 2020, hunters were asked (while purchasing their hunting licence) if they would like to receive their survey electronically via email. Any hunter who answered ‘yes’ to this question will receive notice of their harvest questionnaire via email. Hunters receiving their questionnaire notification via email will be provided a unique eight-digit login ID and be asked to visit the same website printed on the paper survey. If you chose to receive notice of your questionnaire electronically, please ensure your email address is up to date in BC Hunting Online.


I never receive a questionnaire. Why?

If you received a LEH authorization for bison, elk, moose or mule deer, the ministry will send you a questionnaire. Also, if you purchased a hunting or species licence, it is likely the ministry will send you a questionnaire. If you didn't receive a questionnaire for these hunts it is either because you did not receive an LEH authorization, were not randomly selected or because the ministry does not have your correct mailing or email address. Each year the ministry sends a considerable number of harvest questionnaires to incorrect mailing addresses because hunters have not maintained their current address with the Wildlife and Habitat Branch. Keeping your address current will ensure that you receive your harvest questionnaire.

To change your mailing or email address, please:

  1. Log onto your Fish and Wildlife profile using the BC Hunting Online service.
  2. Call FrontCounter BC at 1-877-855-3222.
  3. Visit your local ServiceBC Centre or FrontCounter BC office.

Where can I find the results from the harvest questionnaire?

Responses to the questionnaire are analyzed and used to estimate hunting activity, including the number of hunters, hunt days and harvest. The hunter sample survey provides estimates of all hunting activity (GOS and LEH combined) at the wildlife management unit, region, and provincial levels. The LEH survey provides estimates of LEH hunting activity at the LEH hunt level for each LEH hunt. 
For additional information or to access the data, see Hunting Data or DataBC .

Where do I find Wildlife & Habitat Branch policies and procedures?

These are found on our Wildlife Policy page.

What is “Hunting”?

The definition of hunt is:

“"hunt" includes shooting at, attracting, searching for, chasing, pursuing, following after or on the trail of, stalking or lying in wait for wildlife, or attempting to do any of those things, whether or not the wildlife is then or subsequently wounded, killed or captured,
(a) with intention to capture the wildlife, or
(b) while in possession of a firearm or other weapon;"

If a person meets the definition of “hunt”, they must be in possession of a hunting licence (unless exempt).


Can you use bait to lure wildlife for the purpose of hunting?

There are no provincial prohibitions on baiting ungulates for the purpose of hunting during the open season. It is prohibited to feed or bait ungulates or turkey in the Kootenay Region (PDF, 1.33MB). Baiting deer for the purpose of hunting is permitted in the remainder of the province.

Municipalities have the authority to prohibit the feeding of wildlife within municipal boundaries, it is recommended that you inform yourself on municipal bylaws related to the feeding of wildlife within a municipal boundary. 

The only species where the use of bait for the purpose of hunting is prohibited is for bear and migratory game birds.


What types of shooting or hunting area restrictions are there?

There are various categories of firearms/hunting restrictions in the province. Some of these provisions apply year-round, some are seasonal. These are:

  • No shooting, hunting or trapping areas - there is no open season (includes hunting and trapping) for any wildlife, and no shooting, in those areas.
  • No shooting or hunting areas - there is no open season for any wildlife species in those areas, except as prescribed for the trapping of furbearing animals.
  • No shooting areas - a designated area in which the discharge of a firearm is prohibited. Areas that are subject to a No Shooting restriction are open to the use of archery equipment. Archery equipment for the purpose of hunting is only prohibited for those areas that have a hunting closure.
  • No hunting areas - there is no open season for any wildlife species, except as prescribed for the trapping of furbearing animals.
  • No hunting or trapping areas - there is no open season for hunting or trapping of any wildlife species.
  • Shot Only Area - the discharge of a firearm is prohibited unless the person uses shot only.
  • Rifle Prohibited Area - the discharge of a rifle is prohibited.
  • Toxic Shot Prohibit Area - only the use of non-toxic shot may be used.

What are the hunting regulations for First Nations Hunting?

Persons registered under the Indian Act (Canada) residing in B.C. are exempt from the requirement to obtain a hunting, trapping, or fishing licence in the province. It is recommended that Indigenous People carry their status card with them while hunting, trapping, or angling.

First Nations that are hunting, trapping, or fishing on the traditional territory of their band can harvest fish or wildlife for food, social, or ceremonial purposes without having to abide by the regulations like open season, gear restrictions, and quota/bag limits. However, all First Nations must abide with regulations regarding safety and conservation, regardless of where they are hunting or angling.

First Nations residing in B.C. do not need a hunting or angling licence (or species licence) and are not required to take hunter safety training. However, note that First Nations  hunting or fishing outside their traditional territory are required to abide by all hunting and angling regulations (except the requirement to hold a hunting or angling licence) and it is their responsibility to learn and understand the regulations for hunting and angling in the province. Please contact the band for a description or map of their traditional territory.

First Nations not residing in B.C. and who do not have traditional territory in B.C. are considered Non-Residents and must abide by all hunting regulations pertaining to non-resident hunters in the province. Visit Non-Resident Hunting in B.C. for more information.


Where can I find limited entry hunting and management unit maps?


Firearms for protection from wildlife or target practice:

Firearms regulations, including prohibited firearms classifications, are the jurisdiction of the Federal Canadian Firearms Program. If you are licensed in accordance with federal regulations and the firearm you possess is permitted as per federal regulations, there are no prohibitions on carrying the firearm on crown land for the purposes of protection or target practice.

There are numerous locations throughout the province, on provincial, municipal, and federal lands where the discharge and or possession of a loaded firearm is prohibited. Please review the Hunting and Trapping Regulations Synopsis for information on No Hunting and Shooting areas within the province, pages 13, 14, and 15. For specific closures please refer to the regional section of the synopsis. 

For information on municipal bylaws please contact the municipality of interest. For information on federal lands (National Parks, Department of National Defence areas, etc.) please contact the appropriate federal agency.

The definition of hunting is:

“"hunt" includes shooting at, attracting, searching for, chasing, pursuing, following after or on the trail of, stalking or lying in wait for wildlife, or attempting to do any of those things, whether or not the wildlife is then or subsequently wounded, killed or captured,'
(a) with intention to capture the wildlife, or
(b) while in possession of a firearm or other weapon;”

If a person meets the definition of “hunt”, they must be in possession of a hunting licence (unless exempt).

Research into the effectiveness of bear spray as protection from predators is encouraged; it is widely considered one of the most effective bear deterrents available.


Can I snare rabbits under the authority of a hunting licence?

It is legal to snare rabbits in B.C. under the authority of a hunting licence. However, the person using the snare must first complete a trapper education course, be a licensed hunter, abide by open seasons and bag limits, and the snare must be non-braided, no heavier than 20 gauge and without a locking device. 

In order to set a snare for rabbits in B.C., the person must first complete a trapper education course; no trapping licence is required, but completion of the course is required.

Additionally, note the following regulations pertaining to the trapping of furbearers (note that snowshoe hares are not considered fur bearers):

A person commits an offence if they incidentally trap furbearers in a rabbit snare. Furbearers include:

 

Scientific Name

Common Name

Canis latrans

coyote

Canis lupus

wolf

Ursus americanus

black bear

Castor canadensis

beaver

Lutra canadensis

river otter

Ondatra zibethicus

muskrat

Vulpes vulpes

fox

Martes americana

marten

Martes pennanti

fisher

Mustela erminea

ermine

Mustela vison

mink

Mustela frenata

longtailed weasel

Mustela nivalis

least weasel

Tamiasciurus hudsonicus

red squirrel

Tamiasciurus douglasii

Douglas squirrel

Glaucomys sabrinus

northern flying squirrel

Gulo gulo

wolverine

Lynx canaensis

lynx

Lynx rufus

bobcat

Procyon lotor

raccoon

Mephitis mephitis

striped skunk

Spilogale putorius

spotted skunk

Other legal methods of hunting a snowshoe hare include by the use of a firearm and archery equipment. 

B.C. is home to 5 different species of rabbit. Two of these species, the European Cottontail and the Eastern Cottontail, are not native to B.C., and because of the invasive nature of these species they can be hunted at any time anywhere in the province. These species are found primarily on the coast and Vancouver Island. These two species are also found in other areas of the province where owners release these “pets” into urban areas and parks. There is no closed season and no bag limit for hunting European or Eastern Cottontail rabbits anywhere in the province.

Of the three native species of rabbit in B.C., only the snowshoe hare has an open season. The other two species, the White-tailed Jack Rabbit and the Nuttail’s Cottontail, are both found in the Okanagan and Similkameen Valleys and have no open season for hunting. The White-tailed Jack rabbit can be identified by larger ears and hind legs, and is able to travel at speeds up to 55 km/hour. The Nuttail’s Cottontail is difficult to distinguish from a snowshoe hare, although they are rarely found in cultivated fields or orchards. In the Okanagan Region there is an open season on snowshoe hare from August 1 to April 30, the daily bag limit is 10. Hunters in the Okanagan Region must positively identify rabbits as snowshoe hare prior to harvest.


How can I prepare my harvested wildlife for possession and transporting it home?

A hunter must be able to prove the sex and species of harvest wildlife when transporting it from the kill location to their normal dwelling place, a meatcutter, or a cold storage plant.

Relevant legislation/regulation from the Wildlife Act and Hunting Regulations include:

The reproductive organs (as described by regulation) and the unskinned tail must be left naturally attached to one part of the carcass. The remainder of the harvested animal can be processed (cut, wrapped, etc.), however it is recommended that the meat and evidence of sex and species of each specimen be kept together and labeled, and separate from any other harvested wildlife.


How many rounds can I have in my firearm?

The only type of firearm that has a restriction on the quantity of ammunition that can be contained in the magazine are shotguns loaded with shot. There are no limits to the amount of ammunition that can be contained in the magazine of a center fire or rim fire rifle. Below are some of the regulations that restrict the number of shot shells that can be contained in the magazine of a shotgun.

A shotgun must contain a plug that makes the magazine incapable of holding more than 2 cartridges and is incapable of removal except by disassembling the gun. A plug is not required for a person that hunts big game with a shotgun loaded with single projection ammunition (slugs). A person hunting small game with a shotgun, or hunting with a shotgun loaded with ammunition that is not a single projectile (shot), must have a plug in place that limits the magazine to 2 cartridges.


What are the regulations for hunting feral pigs in B.C.?

Feral pigs (meaning pigs of the genus Sus that are not in captivity or not otherwise under a person’s control) are classified as Schedule C wildlife in the provincial Wildlife Act. This means they can be killed anywhere and anytime in the province, and there is no bag limit. In order to hunt feral pigs a hunter must have a valid BC hunting licence (no species licence, aka tags, are required to hunt feral pigs). A hunting licence is not required for the owner of private land, or an agent of the owner, to hunt them on private land if they are causing damage. 

It is prohibited to possess or transport live feral pigs (the only way a hunter or other member of the public can possess or transport a feral pig is if it is dead) with the exception that the previous owner, or an agent of the owner, may possess and transport a live feral pig for the purpose of recapture.

All other regulations apply when hunting feral pigs. For example, Motor Vehicle Prohibitions, No Shooting Areas, No Hunting Areas, prohibited hours for hunting, etc. are still in effect for hunters targeting feral pigs.

Note that there are very few feral pigs in B.C. Designating feral pigs as Schedule C wildlife was a result of the province watching, and attempting to avoid, what is happening in other jurisdictions. Throughout many of the states and prairie provinces wild boars are causing significant environmental and economic damage. Feral pigs (specifically razor backs/wild boars) can survive in virtually all environmental conditions in B.C. Feral pigs have not established large populations in the province and that’s the way we want it. It is hoped that this regulation change will reduce the potential for them to establish a foothold in BC.

This regulation change is likely going to be an opportunistic hunting opportunity, being that very few individuals who specifically go out to target feral pigs will kill one, however if a hunter targeting other wildlife happens to see one, they are encouraged to kill/harvest it. If a hunter harvests a feral pig, they must report the harvest through the Compulsory Reporting program.


Can I keep roadkill?

The Provincial Wildlife Act states:

“Possession of wildlife

33 (2) A person commits an offence if the person has dead wildlife or a part of any wildlife in his or her possession except as authorized under a licence or permit or as provided by regulation.”

“Transportation of wildlife

37 A person who ships or transports in B.C., or engages another person to ship or transport in B.C., wildlife or fish or parts of them, except as provided by regulation, commits an offence.”

There are no regulations that permit the possession of roadkill wildlife (other than trappers), and a person that has roadkill wildlife in their possession without the applicable permit commits an offence. A hunting licence and species licence are not sufficient to possess roadkill wildlife, hunting/species licences are applicable only when a hunter harvests an animal, by hunting, in accordance with the legislation/regulations of the Wildlife Act (i.e. open seasons, allowable hunting methods, etc.).

Licensed Trappers, or individuals exempt from holding a trapping licence, may possess some species of roadkill under specific conditions:


Can I track/dispatch wounded game that has gone onto private property?

There are no exceptions in the provincial Trespass Act related to tracking and dispatching of wounded game. If private land is fenced or posted as no trespassing or no hunting a hunter needs to obtain permission (written permission is recommended) to access that private land. In addition to the Trespass Act, the Wildlife Act has the following provision:

Provisions of the Trespass Act that apply to accessing private land for the purpose of hunting include:

Note: If a property owner posts their private land with “No Hunting” signs, the property owners may still hunt, and allow people to hunt, on their private land. Similarly, if a person posts a “No Trespassing” sign on their private property, the property owner is still permitted to be, or allow others to be, on the private land.


Can I use a drone to hunt? Can I bring a drone with me when I’m hunting?

The regulation pertaining to drones and hunting are as follows:

The possession of a drone is prohibited when a person is on a hunting expedition; if you’re hunting leave the drone at home.


Can a non-licensed hunter accompany a hunter on a hunt?

The Wildlife Act definition of hunt is:

“"hunt" includes shooting at, attracting, searching for, chasing, pursuing, following after or on the trail of, stalking or lying in wait for wildlife, or attempting to do any of those things, whether or not the wildlife is then or subsequently wounded, killed or captured,
(a) with intention to capture the wildlife, or
(b) while in possession of a firearm or other weapon;”

If an individual is doing an activity that is captured in the definition of hunt, they are required to possess all appropriate hunting licences. 

Many non-hunting people participate in the activity of hunting; if the accompanying individual is not meeting the definition of hunt (i.e. is not in possession of a firearm or other weapon) they would not require a hunting licence and may accompany a licensed hunter. People that are in the field and not in possession of a firearm or other weapon (and do not intend to capture wildlife) would not be meeting the definition of hunting and would not require a hunting licence. 

A person may accompany family members or friends on their hunt and observe; in fact, it is encouraged that hunters mentor and initiate non-hunters into the sport. The accompanying non-hunting individual may assist in packing harvested wildlife out of the field, however ensure that the licensed hunter accompanies the meat at all times unless the non-licensed individuals have a completed “record of receipt for transporting wildlife”, found on page 24 of the Hunting and Trapping Regulations Synopsis.

Another option for the non-hunter to consider is applying for a once-in-a-lifetime Initiation Licence, which is meant to give supervised exposure to hunting without the requirement to take hunter safety training.


Can an adult’s species licence be cancelled when they’re accompanying a youth that harvests an animal during a youth only season?

Any licensed hunter under the age of 18, regardless of the type of licence they have, may participate in youth-only seasons. The Wildlife and Habitat Branch is committed to recruiting young hunters into the sport and encourage youth hunters to participate in youth only opportunities. All hunters under the age of 18 must be accompanied by a licensed hunter 18 years of age or older that meets the prescribed qualifications as outlined in the youth licences documentation.

Youth licences do not come with species licenses. If a youth hunter harvests an animal under the authority of a youth hunting licence the harvest comes off the bag limit of the accompanying adult hunter. If this harvest occurs during the youth only season the accompanying adult cancels the appropriate species licence before handling the harvested animal. In this scenario the youth and adult should remain in each other’s company while in possession of, and transporting, the harvested animal.

What is the limited entry hunting (LEH) draw?

Limited entry hunting is a lottery system used by the province of B.C. to manage wildlife harvest for mostly big game species that require a higher level of harvest control than is achieved through general open season hunting.


What species are managed under LEH?

Depending on location, time of year and animal class, some species are managed under LEH, some under general open season (GOS) and some under both systems. Hunters can apply to hunt LEH moose, elk, caribou, mountain goat, mountain sheep, bison, mule deer, white tailed deer, black bear and turkey in many areas of the province.


What process is used to select winning applicants?

The draw is entirely random, meaning each applicant is assigned a unique random number between 1 and 2 billion. Hunters are then sorted from lowest to highest random number with authorizations being assigned to hunters who drew the lowest random numbers over hunters who drew higher ones. In general, if there are 10 authorizations available for a particular hunt, the 10 hunters with the lowest random numbers will receive an authorization for that hunt.


What are my chances of winning?

The chances of winning an LEH authorization depend on the odds, which is different for each species and area. Hunt odds (the number of applicants vs. the number of available authorizations) vary from below 1:1 to over 1000:1 and can change significantly over time.


I’ve applied for 10:1 odds hunt 5 years in a row and have not won. Why?

A hunter applying on a 10:1 odds hunt has a one in ten chance of winning.  An example would be 100 applications received with 10 available authorizations. In any given year, 10 hunters will be chosen at random out of the 100 that applied.


My neighbour is successful more often than I am. Why?

Analysis of previous year’s draw data shows that the frequency with which hunters win over time is directly proportional to hunt odds. Hunts with high odds have few frequent winners where low odds hunts have many.

Often, when these types of claims are examined, we find that the successful neighbor is applying on low odds hunts, while the hunter who registered the complaint is applying in higher odds hunts relative to the neighbor.


Does B.C. use a weighted draw system?

Yes, B.C. uses an ‘enhanced odds’ system for decreasing the likelihood of draw success of previously successful hunters over unsuccessful hunters.  Any hunter who applies for a species (other than deer and turkey) that was successful in the previous year has their chance of being drawn reduced by 50% compared to a previously unsuccessful applicant. In the case of Roosevelt elk in regions 1 and 2 and moose; anyone drawn in the previous three years will have their odds reduced by 66%.


Why does B.C. not use a weighted system where unsuccessful applicants’ chances of success increase over time?

A weighted system, where a hunter’s chance of winning continually increases over time, tends to discourage recruitment of new hunters into the LEH system. If we take an example of a 50:1 odds hunt (not uncommon in B.C.); most new hunters will need to apply for many years before having any chance of winning. Also, the average age of hunters winning would increase substantially.


How will I know if I’ve won?

You can check whether you’ve won an LEH authorization through BC Hunting Online, or over the counter at your local licenced vendor.


Do I still have to buy a hunting licence if I win an LEH authorization?

If you intend to hunt in B.C. you are required to purchase a basic hunting licence and appropriate species licence. If you’ve won an authorization and plan to hunt that species, you must purchase a basic and species licence.


Can I give my LEH authorization to someone else?

No. LEH authorizations are non-transferable.


What is a shared hunt?

Shared LEH hunts allow up to four people to share an authorization to harvest up to two animals. Every hunter that is enrolled in a shared group is assigned their own unique random number and if one of those numbers is a winner, every hunter in the group wins a ‘shared authorization’ (if two hunters apply and one wins, both hunters share one authorization or one animal). Shared hunts are available for moose and bison and allow for greater hunting opportunity while harvesting the same number of animals under a non-shared scenario.


What is a group hunt?

A group hunt allows up to four people to apply for a single hunt. During the draw process, all four hunters are assigned one unique random number. If that random number is a winner, all four hunters win an authorization for that hunt. Group hunts are available for all LEH species except mule deer, region 1 and region 2 elk, moose, bison and black bear.


What if I made a mistake when submitting my application, and I want to change my hunt codes?

LEH applications are non-refundable and cannot be modified after submission.  However, if you made a mistake when submitting your application, you may void your application up until the draw closes for applications.  You may re-apply for the same species if you void an application, but you will be required to submit payment again.