Hazardous Waste Manifests

A manifest is a shipping document that tracks the movement of hazardous waste.  It accompanies shipments of hazardous waste and documents the type and the amount of waste, who shipped it, who transported it, who received it and how it was handled. The manifest may be completed by hand, typewriter or printer. A manifest is a 6-copies form which is distributed and kept on file by different parties.

General Manifest Form

General Manifest Sample FormGeneral Manifest Sample Form (reverse)

Unique B.C. Identifier Number in B.C. Manifests

A unique identifier number is found at the top right of the manifest form and follows these patterns:

  • Currently for the B.C. 6-copies paper manifests letter B followed by another letter, plus 6 numbers. Example: BB 12345-6
  • Future changes for the B.C. 6-copies paper manifests letter B followed by another letter, plus 7 numbers. Example, BC 123456-7

Transporting Roles

Each party involved in the transport of hazardous waste are all required to fill out copies of a manifest. Each party must complete his/her section of the manifest, sign off on the content, and distribute and retain the appropriate copies. A consignor should provide the manifest form; however, many carriers and receivers will provide a manifest to the consignor as part of their services.

  • Consignor (Generator or shipper): a person/company who owns the hazardous waste and causes or allows the hazardous waste to be transported from the property where it is produced or stored. They complete {Part A of the manifest. 
  • Carrier (Transporter): a person/company that transports more than the prescribed quantity of hazardous waste.  They may be required to have a valid hazardous waste transport licence. They complete Part B of the manifest.
  • Consignee (Receiver): a person/company who receives hazardous waste. They must have all the applicable authorizations to receive hazardous waste. They complete Part C of the manifest.

Quantities Requiring Use of a Manifest

When transporting more than the amount of hazardous waste indicated in the table below, a manifest must be used. Section 46(1) of the Hazardous Waste Regulation (HWR) sets these prescribed quantities.

It is important to note that for “solid”, “liquid” or “compressed gases”, the quantity is the total quantity of solid hazardous wastes, liquid hazardous wastes or gaseous hazardous wastes, and not of each type of hazardous waste.

Hazardous Waste Amount [HWR S.46(1)]

Solids

5 kg
Liquids 5 litres
Compressed Gases (container capacity) 5 litres
Waste Oil 210 litres
Waste Paint 210 litres
Waste Batteries 1,000 kg
PCB (liquid or solid)

Any quantity that contains greater than 500 g of PCB

When transporting more than the quantities indicated above, the carrier most likely will need to have a license to transport hazardous waste.  Click Transporting Hazardous Waste and Transport Licence Application Process for more information.  

B.C. Manifests and Shipping Documents from Other Jurisdictions

If the shipment originates in B.C. or is shipped from B.C., you must use a B.C. manifest, issued by the Government of British Columbia with a unique B.C. Identifier number. This applies to intra-provincial (within B.C.), interprovincial (to other provinces/territories) or international (export) shipments.  See HWR s. 46(3)(b)

If the shipment originated or is shipped from outside of B.C., then the shipping document required is a manifest from another province or the movement document required by the federal government. This applies to interprovincial (from other provinces/territories) or international (import) shipments. See HWR s. 46(3)(a).

In some cases, waste may be shipped into B.C. that meets the definition of hazardous waste in B.C. but does not meet the definition of hazardous waste in the jurisdiction(s) from which the waste is being shipped. In such a case, a regulated must use a manifest, either from another province or from Canada (Environment and Climate Change Canada) or the B.C. manifest in paper form, just prior to the waste entering B.C. For reasons outlined above, a TDG shipping document or bill of lading cannot be used in lieu of a manifest.

The detailed information below provides further explanation on when to use certain types of shipping documents from other jurisdictions.

The federal Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) has jurisdiction over the movement of hazardous waste between provinces (interprovincial) and across international borders. ECCC administers 2 regulations: Interprovincial Movement of Hazardous Waste Regulations (IMHWR) and Export and Import of Hazardous Waste and Hazardous Recyclable Material Regulations (EIHWHRMR).

ECCC uses a manifest, known in its regulations as a movement document. There are 2 formats of movement document: paper and electronic. The electronic format was implemented on September 24, 2019.

        1. Paper Format

If a paper form movement document from ECCC is used for hazardous waste shipped from B.C., the B.C. paper manifest must also be used. This is regardless of where the hazardous waste will be shipped to. In other words, ECCC’s paper format movement document does not comply with provincial regulatory requirements.

If using only the B.C. paper manifest for shipments from B.C. however, the regulated will meet both the provincial and federal regulations.

         2. Electronic Format

The use of the electronic movement document created from ECCC’s Canadian Notice and Manifest Tracking System (CNMTS) may or may not be allowed based on the type of movement: international, interprovincial (between provinces) or intra-provincial (within B.C.). If ECCC’s electronic movement document is used for only international shipments and under certain conditions, it will meet provincial regulatory requirements and can be used instead of the B.C.’s paper-based manifest. This does not apply to interprovincial or intra-provincial shipments of hazardous waste from B.C.

The details of the usage of the electronic manifest are explained below.

Electronic International Movement Documents:

CNMTS tracks from beginning to end the shipment of hazardous waste from Canada to the final country of destination, until it shows that the hazardous waste has been recycled or disposed of. B.C. and ECCC have entered into an agreement where ECCC’s electronic movement document (i.e., electronic manifest) issued from CNMTS for only international shipments will be deemed as B.C. manifests (i.e., manifest and identifying number being issued by the B.C. Government).  This agreement is valid until March 31, 2022; B.C. and Canada may renew the agreement after this date. In summary, the electronic movement document produced from CNMTS may be used instead of the B.C. paper manifest for hazardous waste shipped from B.C. directly to another country while a valid B.C.-Canada agreement is in place.

Electronic Interprovincial and Intra-provincial Movement Document:

  1. The electronic movement document produced by CNMTS must NOT be used to replace the B.C. manifest for hazardous waste shipped from B.C. to another place within B.C. (intra-provincial) nor to another province/territory (interprovincial).
  2. If an electronic movement document is used for the intra-provincial movement or interprovincial movement, a B.C. paper manifest must also be used in order to meet the provincial regulations.

The federal Transport Canada has jurisdiction over the transportation of dangerous goods in Canada and administers the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act and Regulations (TDGR). The TDGR requires a shipping document to track the movement of dangerous goods. Dangerous goods that are no longer used for their original purposes are hazardous waste, except for Class 1 and 7. Some hazardous wastes are not dangerous goods.

If a dangerous goods shipping document is used to transport hazardous waste originated or shipped from B.C., then the B.C. manifest must also be used. The dangerous goods shipping document or bill of lading will only meet the federal TDGR but does not comply with provincial regulatory requirements.

If using only the B.C. manifest for shipments from B.C., the regulated will meet both the provincial and federal regulations, including Transport Canada’s TDGR. Please note that there may be some changes that you may need to make to the provincial manifest to meet certain TDGR requirements. These came about with their 2015 amendments to the TDGR. For more information see the guidance titled “Changes to the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations Affecting the B.C. Manifest and Supplement Forms”.

If a paper form or electronic manifest obtained from another province or territory is used for hazardous waste originated or shipped from B.C., the B.C. paper manifest must also be used. The other province’s manifest does not meet section 46(3)(b) of the Hazardous Waste Regulation. 

A manifest from other provinces and territories may be used only if the hazardous waste was shipped from outside of B.C.

 

When is a Manifest Form not Required?

A manifest form is not required when:

  1. The waste is not hazardous waste
  2. The quantities of hazardous waste being transported are below the minimum thresholds as per S.46(1) of the Hazardous Waste Regulation.
  3. The hazardous waste is transported:
    • Solely within the property boundaries of the consignor for a distance less than 100 km
    • On a public road for a distance less than 3 km or
    • By a homeowner or a farmer from their home or farm directly to a waste management facility operated by the province or a municipality

Note: A “homeowner” is a person who is the owner of a fully detached dwelling who lives in or intends to live in that dwelling as a permanent residence. For strata properties, a homeowner is the owner of a freehold estate in a strata lot with a dwelling (for example, a condominium) who lives in or intends to live in that dwelling as a permanent residence.

Manifest Supplement Forms

Manifest supplement forms can be useful and cost-effective in the following situations:

  • A consignor has various types of hazardous waste and all of them will not fit into a single manifest form
  • A shipment may be a long haul and require that it be done by various carriers
  • A carrier needs to pick up the same type of hazardous waste from various consignors and send it to a receiver

There are 3 types of supplement forms: multiple carriers, multiple consignors or multiple wastes. Information on these types of supplement forms is presented below.

For clarity, a supplement form is not a shipping document on its own – it is used as a supplement to the manifest form. If used, the supplement form must be attached to a manifest.

The Multiple Consignors Supplement Form, the Multiple Carriers Supplement Form and the Multiple Wastes Supplement Form may only be used for a single trip, and not for multiple trips. In this case, 'trip' means the transportation of hazardous waste from the consignor(s) to a single intended consignee or another intermediary site where the hazardous waste is off-loaded or stored.  The use of the supplement form is dependent on various conditions being met, see the details in Part 7 of the HWR; some information is also described below.

Types of Supplement Forms 

A Multiple Consignors Form is used with a manifest when a carrier collects hazardous wastes with the same shipping name from more than one consignor, in order to establish a bulk load.

Multiple Consignors Form Sample     Multiple Consignors Form Sample (reverse)

In B.C., waste carriers may carry a completed manifest form with a Multiple Consignor Form (Form 3) attached when collecting hazardous waste of the same type from more than one consignor and delivering the completed shipment to a single receiving location. The form is intended to reduce paperwork by allowing the carrier to attach the completed multiple consignor's forms (s) to a single manifest rather than using a manifest for each consignor.

The cumulative total amount of waste in the load must be inserted on the multiple consignors’ form (last column on the right) after each pickup throughout the trip. This is a requirement of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act. Once the load is complete, the total amount of hazardous waste being transported to the consignee (receiver) must be entered on the manifest form.

A Multiple Carrier Form is used with a manifest when a shipment is transported by more than one carrier from a single consignor to a single destination (consignee).

Multiple Carriers Sample Form     Multiple Carriers Sample Form (reverse)

A Multiple Wastes Form is used with a manifest when there is not enough room on the manifest to record all the wastes being carried in one load from one consignor and being delivered to one consignee.

Multiple Waste Sample Form     Multiple Waste Sample Form (reverse)

 

Completing Manifest and Supplement Forms  

Consignor, carrier and receiver must complete specific parts of the manifest forms. Other people such as an agent of the consignor, or someone who the consignor has given authority to, may fill out part A of the manifest on behalf of the consignor; however, the consignor is ultimately responsible and liable for the information that was filled out in the form.

Review the Manual for Completing B.C.’s Hazardous Waste Manifests and Supplementary Forms for detailed information for each party.

Distributing Manifest Copies & Keeping Records

The manifest has six (6) copies so that applicable copies are distributed to the different parties:

  • Jurisdictional agency: B.C. Government and if applicable the government of another province or country
  • Consignor
  • Carrier
  • Receiver

Detailed information on the distribution of the manifest and supplement forms is also in the Manual for Completing B.C.’s Hazardous Waste Manifests and Supplementary Forms.

The information below summarizes which specific copies of the manifest and supplement form are sent to and kept by the different parties.

Manifest Discrepancy Notifications

Reporting discrepancies or irregularities related to manifest is a requirement under the Hazardous Waste Regulation. There are three manifest discrepancies to be notified or reported to the director. There are variations to these discrepancies and depending on the nature of the discrepancy, the required actions also vary.

When the hazardous waste quantity received is 5% greater or less than shown on the manifest, the receiver must notify the director and submit an annual summary report. 

Notifying Single 5% Manifest Discrepancy

Single notification for a 5% discrepancy in hazardous waste quantity is required to meet section 5(4) of the Hazardous Waste Regulation. This notification must:

  • Be submitted within 3 days of receiving the hazardous waste
  • Be reported by the receiver/consignee
  • Include a scanned copy of the manifest with the description of the discrepancy
  • Include a separate written description of the discrepancy and any applicable corrective action taken
  • Be emailed to EnvAuthorizationsReporting@gov.bc.ca, using the file name conventions provided below

Follow this naming convention to submit the notification:

  1. The email subject line must follow this format XXXXXX YYYY-MM-DD YYYY MD SIN, where:
    • XXXXXX = four to six-digit HWR registered site (i.e., authorization) number of the receiving site
    • YYYY-MM-DD = the date of submission (year-month-day) 
    • YYYY = the year of the discrepancies are reported for
    • MD SIN = short for “manifest discrepancy – single”
  2. Attachment name: Duplicate of the email subject line, without the registered site number.

NOTE: both the consignor and the receiver must still submit, respectively, Copy 1 and Copy 3 of the manifest to the Ministry as required under the Regulation. This 5% discrepancy notification does not remove the submission of the applicable copies of the manifest to the Ministry.

Submitting Annual Summary of 5% Discrepancy Report

An annual summary discrepancy report is also required in addition to the manifest discrepancy report to meet section 5(5) of the Hazardous Waste Regulation. The annual discrepancy report must:

  • Be submitted within 60 days of the end of the calendar year
  • Be prepared by the receiver/consignee
  • Include annual summary that contains all manifest discrepancies for the previous year and explanation of remedial actions taken
  • Be emailed to EnvAuthorizationsReporting@gov.bc.ca, using the file name conventions provided below

Follow this naming convention to submit the report:

  1. The email subject line must follow this format XXXXXX YYYY-MM-DD YYYY MD SUM, where:
    • XXXXXX = four to six-digit HWR registered site (i.e., authorization) number of the receiving site
    • YYYY-MM-DD = the date of submission (year-month-day) 
    • YYYY = the year of the discrepancies are reported for
    • MD SUM = short for “manifest discrepancy – summary”
  2. Attachment name: Duplicate of the email subject line, without the registered site number.

The owner of a hazardous management facility must not accept hazardous waste that does not match the description of the waste on the accompanying manifest [HWR s. 5(2)(a)].  Should this occur, the receiver must take the following actions (depending on the scenario that applies).

Scenario 1: Waste does not match the description on the manifest, but the intended receiver is authorized to manage the waste.

If the owner of the hazardous waste facility has authorization, as identified in the facility’s approved operational plan, to manage the waste that is misidentified on (or omitted from) the manifest, they do not need to seek director approval to receive the waste as required in HWR s.5(2)(c). However, the manifest information discrepancy report, described below, must be submitted in accordance with HWR s.5(2)(d).

The notification must:

  • Be immediately reported by the generator, agents/consultants or the receiver/consignee
  • Include a scanned copy of the manifest and a description of the error/discrepancy
  • Include a separate written description of the error/discrepancy, the correct information and any corrective action is taken
  • Use the authorization number of the receiving facility as part of the naming convention
  • Be emailed to EnvAuthorizationsReporting@gov.bc.ca, using the file name conventions provided below

Follow this naming convention to submit the notification:

  1. The email subject line must follow this format: XXXXXX YYYY-MM-DD YYYY MD INF, where:
    • XXXXXX = four to six-digit HWR registered site (i.e., authorization) number of the receiving site
    • YYYY-MM-DD = the date of submission (year-month-day) 
    • YYYY = the year of the discrepancies are reported for
    • MD INF = short for “manifest discrepancy - information”
  2. Attachment name: Duplicate of the email subject line, without the registered site number.

Scenario 2: Waste does not match the description on the manifest and the intended receiver is not authorized to manage the waste.

If the owner of a hazardous waste facility does not have the authorization to manage waste that is misidentified on (or omitted from) the manifest, they must immediately notify a director to seek authorization to accept the waste or for other instructions. They must receive authorization to receive the waste before the waste can be off-loaded and managed at the facility [HWR s. 5(2)(c-d)].

Request for authorization to receive the waste can be initiated by:

Follow this naming convention to submit the request for authorization:

  1. The email subject line must follow this format: XXXXXX YYYY-MM-DD MD REQ4AUTH, or NO AUTH# YYYY-MM-DD MD REQ4AUTH, where:
    • XXXXXX = four to six-digit HWR registered site (i.e., authorization) number of the receiving site; if your site has authorization for other types of hazardous waste
    • NO AUTH# = short for no authorization number, if your site does not have any type of authorization to receive hazardous waste
    • YYYY-MM-DD = the date of submission (year-month-day) 
    • MD REQ4AUTH = short for “manifest discrepancy – request for authorization”
  2. Attachment name: Duplicate of the email subject line, without the registered site number.

If authorization to receive the waste cannot be obtained, it is the responsibility of the waste generator to ensure that the waste is transported to a facility that has the appropriate authorization to manage the waste.

The owner of a hazardous management facility must not accept hazardous waste that is not accompanied by a manifest [HWR s.5(2)(b)].  Should this occur, the receiver must take the following actions (depending on the scenario that applies).

Scenario 1: No manifest, but the intended receiver is authorized to manage the waste.

If the owner of the hazardous waste facility has authorization, as identified in the facility’s approved operational plan, to manage the waste that was not accompanied by a manifest, they do not need to seek director approval to receive the waste as required in HWR s.5(2)(c). Follow the steps described in scenario 1 of the “Reporting Incorrect Information on Manifest” section above.

Scenario 2: No manifest and intended receiver is not authorized to manage the waste.

If the owner of a hazardous waste facility does not have the authorization to manage waste that arrived without a manifest, they must immediately notify a director to seek authorization to accept the waste or for other instructions [HWR s.5(2)(c-d)]. They must receive authorization to receive the waste before the waste can be offloaded and managed at the facility.

Follow the steps described in scenario 2 of the “Reporting Incorrect Information on Manifest” section above to seek the director’s authorization to receive the waste.

If authorization to receive the waste cannot be obtained, it is the responsibility of the waste generator to ensure that the waste is transported to a facility that has the appropriate authorization to manage the waste.