Make Your Emergency Plan

An illustration of houses

An emergency plan is a playbook for how you and your household will respond to a disaster. Knowing what to do will reduce anxiety and help keep you focused and safe. 

Get started by downloading PreparedBC's fill-in-the-blanks emergency plan (PDF,1.9MB). It will compile the vital information you'll need to respond, as well as establish how you'll communicate and reconnect with loved ones if separated. 

Use the guides below to help with your planning. They'll prompt you to consider what preparedness should look like for you based on the unique needs of your household, your neighbourhood or business. 

During a disaster, phone, gas and essential services may be disrupted. Stores and gas stations could be closed and roads blocked. You might have to manage on your own for several days or weeks. Use our Household Preparedness Guide (PDF, 1.9MB) to help complete your plan, build a household emergency kit and prepare grab-and-go-bags in case you have to leave. 

Household Preparedness Guide (PDF, 1.9MB)Household Emergency Plan (PDF, 1.9MB) 

Half of all British Columbians live in some form of multi-family housing, such as apartments, condominiums or townhomes. Our Guide for Apartments and Condos (PDF, 2MB) considers the unique needs of preparing as part of a complex. It also has advice for working together. Our neighbours will be important allies during an emergency. Strengthening relationships with them today will mean a faster response and quicker recovery. 

Guide for Apartments & Condos (PDF.2MB)Household Emergency Plan (PDF, 1.09MB)

Having a disability means you likely need to take preparedness actions above and beyond the “basics”. Some  extra considerations are:

  • Your ability to communicate may be restricted.
  • Your surroundings may change and look unfamiliar.
  • Your service animal or guide dog may be hurt or frightened.
  • Your health may be impacted by stress or confusion.

Most importantly, take time to create a trusted support network of at least three people to assist during an emergency. Give them keys to your home and add their contact information to a shared emergency plan. You should also advise members of your support network of any health conditions or medications, and show them how to operate specialized medical or mobility equipment.

Consult our Resources for People with Disabilities Guide (PDF, 720KB) or additional advice on getting ready. 

Disability Resources (PDF, 720KB) Household Emergency Plan (PDF, 1.09MB) 

For seniors in British Columbia, you may need to think about preparedness actions above and beyond the “basics”. Extra considerations include:

  • If you rely on a prescription, talk to your primary care provider about how to keep an extra supply or valid prescription in your emergency kit or grab-and-go bag.
  • A whistle or personal alarm to call for help.
  • Written instructions for special medical or mobility equipment.
  • Extra eye glasses, hearing aids and hearing aid batteries.
  • Spare footwear with any special orthotics.

Most importantly, take time to create a trusted support network of at least three people to assist during an emergency. Give them keys to your home and add their contact information to a shared emergency plan. You should also advise members of your support network of any health conditions or medications, and show them how to operate specialized medical or mobility equipment.

Additional Resources

Household Emergency Plan (PDF, 1.09MB)

Pets are an important part of the family. During an emergency, they will be relying on you to help them through. Make sure they're included in your emergency plan and review our Prepare Your Pets Guide (PDF, 112KB) for additional steps and considerations. 

Prepare Your Pets Guide (PDF, 112KB)Household Emergency Plan (PDF, 1.09MB) 

When disaster strikes, the most immediate help will come from those around you - your neighbours. Connecting and building relationships with them today will mean a better response and faster recovery.

Download the In it Together: Neighbourhood Preparedness Guide (PDF, 2.5MB) and start talking with the people next door. It will help you join forces so you collectively know what to do in an emergency, such as who to check on and what resources are available nearby.

Neighbourhood Guide (PDF, 9.1MB) Household Emergency Plan (PDF, 1.9MB) 

Small businesses are integral to British Columbia’s goods and services supply chain. In 2015, there were approximately 388,500 small businesses operating across the province, representing 98 per cent of all businesses in B.C.

If you are a small business owner, you have invested a significant amount of time, energy and money in your operation. Depending on its size, you may have employees who rely on it for income and stability.

Protect your investment and those who depend on it by using our Small Business Guide (PDF, 2.47MB) and companion Small Business Emergency Plan (PDF 57KB)

Guide for Small Businesses (PDF, 2.47MB) Small Business Emergency Plan (PDF,57KB) 

British Columbia is a world-class tourism destination with rolling ranch lands, snow-crested mountains and a sweeping coastline. Yet with that natural splendor comes some potential risk to visitors who may not be familiar with B.C.'s hazards, such as earthquakestsunamisfloods, and wildfires.

During a disaster, phone, gas, electrical and water services may be disrupted. Roads could be blocked, stores could be closed and gas stations out of service. Food and water could be limited and supplies cut off. It may be weeks before travel routes, utilities and essential services are restored.

Use our Guide for Tourism Operators (PDF, 2.5 MB) and companion Tourism Operator Emergency Plan (PDF, 6MB) to help ensure the safety of guests. 

Guide for Tourism Operators (PDF,2.5MB) Tourism Operator Emergency Plan (PDF.6MB)