Who will use the Early Resolution Process

On December 7, 2020, the provincial court registries in Surrey and Victoria adopted the early resolution and case management features of the new Provincial Court Family Rules.

On May 17, 2021, the new Provincial Court Family Rules were implemented. Surrey and Victoria continue as the only court locations using early resolution (designated as Early Resolution Registries). Other locations may be designated in the future. 

As of May 17, 2021, all provincial court locations, including Surrey and Victoria, are using the same family forms.

How do I know if I should use the Surrey or Victoria registry of the Provincial Court?

Cases already filed with the Victoria Provincial Court will continue there. As of December 7, 2020 for Surrey or May 13, 2019 for Victoria, where there are children involved, file in Surrey or Victoria if it is the closest registry to where the children live most of the time.  If there are no children involved, the person starting the process files in the registry closest to where they live.

Does Early Resolution and Case Management include Ministry of Children and Family Development child protection matters?

The Early Resolution and Case Management process is only for family matters under the Family Law Act in Provincial Court. The process does not apply to matters under the Children, Family and Community Services Act or the Adoption Act.

The Early Resolution and Case Management process is not for:

  • Child protection matters
  • Matters brought to Provincial Court by the Ministry of Children and Family Development or a Delegated Aboriginal Agency

If you are involved in a child protection matter and interested in mediation, there is a separate Child Protection Mediation program that may be available to you. 

Legal Aid BC's Parents Legal Centre helps parents work together to settle their child protection matters early on. It offers services at any stage of the child protection case, from first contact with the Ministry of Children and Family Development or a delegated Aboriginal agency, until it's obvious the matter can't be settled out of court in a cooperative way.