Other Common Conflict Species

Choose one of the following species to learn more about their behaviours:

 

Beavers may cause damage to agricultural or residential property as a result of dam construction, flooding, bank burrowing and tree removal. Habitat modification by beavers can benefit fish, furbearers, reptiles, amphibians, waterfowl and shorebirds. Beavers often will dam culverts, bridges or drainpipes resulting in flooding and property damage.

  • Under section 9(1)(b) of the Wildlife Act, a person commits an offence if the person disturbs, molests or destroys a beaver house, den or dam without a permit.
  • Under section 9(2)(b) a person can legally remove a dam to provide irrigation or drainage under lawful authority for the protection of property.  Under all other circumstances, a person must have a permit to remove beaver dams, dens or houses.

Several permits are needed in order to remove or alter beaver dams or houses. These approvals must be in place before any work can take place. A permit under the Water Act is required to divert or make any changes in or about a stream.

Water level control pipes can be installed in ponds to control water levels and prevent flooding. Beavers are classified as furbearers under the Wildlife Act and may be trapped in-season by a registered trapper.

 

All birds are considered wildlife and are afforded full protection under the BC Wildlife Act.  A person commits an offence if the person except as provided by regulation or by an issued permit, possesses, takes, injures, molests or destroys a bird or its eggs.

Under the Wildlife Act Designation and Exemption Regulation 253/2000 Schedule C, point 2, the following species of birds and their nests or eggs can be destroyed without a permit: crows (except common ravens), black-billed magpies, European starlings, house sparrows, rock doves and brown-headed cowbirds.

Migratory

Ducks, geese and all other migratory birds are under the mandate of the Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS). The CWS is the agency that issues crop damage and scare permits for waterfowl.

  • Migratory birds include such species as Ducks, Geese, Brant, Coots, Snipe, Mourning Doves, Band-tailed Pigeons and more.

Raptors (Hawks, Falcons and Eagles)

Raptors will occasionally kill poultry, domestic rabbits and other small domestic animals. Hawks and Eagles normally attack unconfined domestic animals during the day. Occasionally hawks and owls will enter into poultry houses and cause severe losses.

  • Covering coops with wire mesh (chicken wire) or netting can help prevent raptors from gaining access to poultry.
  • House poultry at night. Poultry can be conditioned to move indoors by feeding them at dusk inside the coop.
  • Raptors often survey an area from a perch to help them locate food. Place metal shaped cones on top of poles to reduce perching sites.Use scarecrows - they must be moved regularly.
  • Scare devices such as cracker shells can also be used to scare off raptors.
  • Under section 34 of the Wildlife Act as person commits an offence if they possess, take, injure, molest or destroy a bird, its nest or its eggs.
 

Fox

Fox can cause serious conflicts for poultry producers and they may also kill young pigs, lambs and small pets. Poultry and livestock losses can be minimized and prevented by installing net wire or electrical fencing.

  • Net wire fences/coops should have openings of less than 3 inches.
  • The bottom of the fence should be buried 0.3 m to 0.9 m (1 to 2 ft.) into the ground to prevent foxes from digging under the fence.
  • The tops of coops should be covered with wire as well.
  • Electric or combination electric and wire fencing is also effective at repelling foxes.

Fox are defined as fur-bearing animals under the Wildlife Act and can only be trapped in-season by a registered trapper. Province wide, hunting is prohibited for fox.

Scare devices are an option to try and help protect poultry and livestock from fox predation. Local feed stores may carry these products.

Like other wild canines, foxes will quickly adapt to scare devices, but such devices may temporarily solve fox conflicts.  If the caller is interested in repellents and scare devices refer to Wolves & Coyotes.

  • Fox that are harassing or menacing domestic animals (livestock) or birds can be hunted or trapped on a person's property under Section 26(2) of the Wildlife Act.
  • Under Section 2 (Property in Wildlife) - section 2(4) states that a person who by accident or for protection of life or property kills wildlife, that wildlife remains the property of the government.
  • Persons must report the killing or wounding of any wildlife.  Failing to report the killing or wounding of any wildlife whether it is for protection of life or property is an offence under section 75 of the Wildlife Act.
  • Persons must comply with all Municipal, Provincial and Federal laws surrounding the use and discharge of firearms or the setting of traps.
  • Persons are liable for any wildlife that is wounded or injured as a result of them exercising their rights under section 26(2) and they are legally responsible for any misuse of firearms.

Marine mammals such as whales, porpoises, and sea lions fall under the mandate of Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

Porcupines will occasionally cause damage to fruit trees, crops, plywood sided cabins, sheds and buildings.

Common wood preservatives may repel porcupines when applied to plywood. Wood preservatives based on metal-salt solutions shouldn't be used.  Porcupines are attracted to salt.

The fungicide, Thiram has been registered in the United States as a squirrel and rabbit repellent. It is noted that it may also repel porcupines. Thiram is used in the Golfing and Turf business.

Porcupines are considered wildlife and are afforded full protection under the BC Wildlife Act. A porcupine cannot be killed unless a permit has been issued - they are no hunting seasons for porcupine in BC.

If you are experiencing property damage as a result of porcupines, refer to the yellow pages to contact a licensed pest control company. 

Raccoons may kill poultry, cause damage to vegetable gardens, lawns, out buildings and residential properties.

  • Use buildings or cages with tightly constructed doors and windows to protect poultry from raccoons
  • Wire mesh and electrical fencing are also options
  • Two-strand electrical fencing can protect lawn and gardens from raccoon damage
  • To prevent damage to residential property, remove all overhanging tree limbs to prevent access
  • Cover possible access points with heavy wire mesh screen

Raccoons are classified as furbearers under the Wildlife Act and may be trapped in-season by a registered trapper.  Raccoons can also be hunted during an open hunting season if the person holds a valid BC hunting licence and they live in an area that is open to hunting and the discharge of firearms or bows.

Section 26(2) of the Wildlife Act allows a person to hunt or trap wildlife that is on their property and is a menace to a domestic animal or bird. Under section 26(1)(f) a person commits an offence if they hunt, take, trap, wound or kill wildlife with poison.

Raccoons cannot be captured or killed without a permit however, a permit is not required for landowners to trap and kill raccoons that are causing damage to their property. Municipal bylaws may prohibit the use of traps, firearms and bows. Contact the local bylaw department.

If you are experiencing property damage as a result of raccoons, refer to the yellow pages to contact a licensed pest control company.

Hare and rabbits can consume approximately 1/2 kg of green vegetation daily. Significant damage can occur when rabbits are attracted to orchards, gardens or agricultural crops. Damage to gardens, ornamental trees or agricultural crops usually occurs when the fixtures are located in close proximity to deciduous forests. Damage can also occur when natural  food is scarce or has dried up in hot weather.

  • Installing woven wire mesh fencing or electrical fencing can prevent hare and rabbit damage.
  • Placing wire mesh around individual trees can protect small ornamental trees.
  • The fungicide, Thiram has been registered in the United States as a squirrel and rabbit repellent.  Thiram is used in the golfing and Turf business.
  • Nuttal’s cottontail and the white-tailed hare are both considered species at risk. These species may not be captured or killed without first obtaining a permit.
  • Snowshoe hare are designated small game and may be legally hunted with a license during open season.
  • Snowhoe hare are aslo listed as Schedule B wildlife and a permit is not required for landowners to trap and kill raccoons that are causing damage to their property.
  • The Eastern cottontail and domestic rabbit are listed under Schedule C and no permit is required to capture or kill but a person must have landowner permission on private property.
  • Municipal bylaws may prohibit the use of traps, firearms and bows. Contact the local bylaw department.
  • If you are experiencing property damage as a result of hare or rabbits, refer to the yellow pages to contact a licensed pest control company.  
 

Common skunk conflicts include burrowing under buildings and sheds, lawn damage, getting into garbage, damaging bee hives, killing poultry and stealing eggs, and minor crop damage.

To keep skunks from denning or digging under buildings, seal off all foundation openings with heavy wire mesh, sheet metal or concrete.

  • Fencing around yards should be buried 1 1/2 to 2 feet into the ground to prevent skunks from digging underneath the fence.  Skunks rarely climb fences.
  • Garbage and other food sources such as rodents can attract skunks.
  • Remove debris such as old cars, stacked lumber, decrepit sheds and buildings that can provide shelter and sources of food (rodents).
  • Mothballs and ammonia soaked clothes can be used to repel skunks. Repellents must be replaced frequently and will likely only act as a short-term fix.
  • Skunks are wildlife under the Wildlife Act.  It is an offence to trap or kill wildlife without a permit or authorization, however, a permit is not required for landowners to trap and kill skunks that are causing damage to their property..
  • Skunks may be trapped in-season by a licence trapper or hunted during open hunting seasons provided the hunter holds a valid BC resident hunting licence and the area that the hunting takes place is open to hunting and the discharge of firearms or bows.
  • Municipal bylaws may prohibit the use of traps, firearms and bows. Contact the local bylaw department.
  • If you are experiencing property damage as a result of skunks, refer to the yellow pages to contact a licensed pest control company.