Home fire escape planning

Fire can spread quickly throughout a home, leaving as little as two minutes to escape safely once the smoke alarm sounds. Making an escape plan and practising an escape drill are important elements of home fire safety.

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  • If there is a fire in your home, you could have less than 2 minutes to get out safely once the smoke alarm sounds
  • Make a fire escape plan. Draw a map of each level of your home showing all doors and windows. Discuss the map with everyone who lives with you
  • Plan two ways out of every room. Choose an outside meeting place in front of your home
  • Make a fire escape plan around your abilities. If you need to use a wheelchair or a cane, make sure you can get to it easily and get out quickly. If you wear hearing aids or eyeglasses, put them next to your bed while you are sleeping
  • Make sure all doors and windows open easily
  • Practise your fire escape plan by having a home fire drill at least twice a year with everyone in the home
  • If there is a fire in your home, get out and stay out. Never go back inside for people, pets or things

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#FireSafety #FirePrevention #PracticeYourPlan #GetLowAndGo #GetOutStayOut

  • Plan ahead! If a fire breaks out in your home, you may have only a few minutes to get out safely once the smoke alarm sounds. Everyone needs to know what to do and where to go if there is a fire.
  • Make a home escape plan. Draw a map of your home showing all doors and windows. Discuss the plan with everyone in your home.
  • Know at least two ways out of every room, if possible. Make sure all doors and windows leading outside open easily.
  • Have an outside meeting place (like a tree, mailbox or light pole) a safe distance from the home where everyone should meet.
  • Practise your home fir drill at night and during the day with everyone in your home, twice a year.
  • Practise using different ways out.
  • Teach children how to escape on their own if you can’t help them.
  • Close doors behind you as you leave, if possible.

 


Additional resources

Follow the links below for resources from National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and the U.S. Fire Administration (FEMA).