Interpreter Frequently Asked Questions

What is Court Services Branch’s (CSB) role in accrediting or certifying interpreters in BC?

  • CSB has no role in either accrediting or certifying interpreters. The Province contracts with interpreters to provide the service of court interpreting.
  • Court interpreters may state that they interpret for the Ministry of Attorney General, but they may no longer say that they are accredited  by the Ministry.

Is there a certain number of hours that is needed to be accredited or a certified interpreter in BC?

Do I have to be a Certified Court Interpreter to be a spoken language contractor with the CSB?

  • No, CSB currently contracts with interpreters with a range of qualifications; this is not changing.

Do I have to be a member of STIBC to be a spoken language contractor with the CSB?

  • No, CSB currently contracts with interpreters who are not members of STIBC; this is not changing.

I am a Certified Court Interpreter, but no longer a member of STIBC. Am I still level 1?

  • No, you are no longer considered a Certified Court Interpreter and will be placed at level 2. It is a condition of certification that you maintain your membership with STIBC.

Do I have to be a member of Westcoast Association of Visual Language Interpreters (WAVLI) to be a visual language contractor with the CSB?

  • No, CSB currently contracts with interpreters who are not members of WAVLI; this is not changing.

Will years/hours of experience be considered when assigning a level?

  • CSB will continue to take the same approach it currently applies when considering experience. It is primarily a consideration for level 3 (non-accredited) interpreters because they do not have the qualifications to be level 1 or 2 (accredited). All spoken language interpreters will be required to submit their qualifications for review to CSB. All visual language interpreters have already submitted their qualifications for review. It will be at that time that each individual will be placed into the proper level according to their qualifications.

Why are Certified Court Interpreters (level 1) getting paid a higher rate than Professionally Qualified court interpreters (level 2)?

  • Certified court interpreters have either passed a written and oral exam that is set by a national body or, they have been certified via an on- dossier process. Once certified, Certified Court Interpreters are required to complete ongoing professional development to maintain their membership with their certifying body.
  • By paying level 1 spoken language interpreters a higher hourly rate than level 2 interpreters, CSB is acknowledging their qualifications, underscoring the necessity of high quality interpretation in the courts, and providing an incentive for other interpreters to  become certified. This supports the administration of justice.