Non-Ministry Funded Employment Programs & Services

Overview

Several non-ministry funded employment programs and services may be available to clients eligible for BC Employment and Assistance (BCEA).  This topic summarizes major programs and services currently offered through federal and provincial government partners.

The Ministry of Jobs, Tourism and Skills Training administers employment programs and services through the Canada-British Columbia Job Fund Agreement (CJFA), as well as programming for older workers and immigrants.  This includes the BladeRunners program for youth.  BCEA clients are eligible to access CJFA programming [for more information, see Additional Resources]. 

The federal government also funds employment programming under the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy (ASETS), the Opportunities Fund, and the Youth Employment Strategy.  

Policy

Effective:  April 2, 2012

Clients with employment obligations will be identified by the ministry through the ICM system for formal referral to the Employment Program of British Columbia (EPBC).  Clients who are not formally referred to the EPBC can be encouraged to access the EPBC self-serve services.  While non-referred clients will generally be given an Employment Plan (EP) for Supervised Independent Work Search (SIWS), they may be referred to other non-ministry programs as appropriate [see Related Links - Employment Program of BC].

Participation in non-ministry employment programs by clients receiving provincial assistance should be documented on either an Employment Plan (HR2863) or a Voluntary Participation Plan (HR SD2916).  [For more information, see Related Links – Employment Plan, or Voluntary Participation Plan.]

Ministry approval for program participation is not required if a client’s participation in a part-time unfunded program of study does not affect the conditions of their EP or their employment-related obligations (i.e. participation in EPBC).  For example, a client could participate in a part-time evening or weekend course without affecting their employment obligations.

Ministry approval is required for participation in a full-time unfunded program or a part-time program that may affect the conditions of a client’s EP or their employment-related obligations. 

For Employment Plan (HR 2863) or Voluntary participation Plan (HR 2916), see Forms and Letters.

Effective:  April 2, 2012

Canada-BC Labour Market Development Agreement (LMDA)

The Canada-BC Labour Market Development Agreement (LMDA) is an agreement between the Governments of Canada and British Columbia to streamline efforts to help unemployed British Columbians move into sustainable employment. LMDA programs are administered by the Province through the ministry’s Employment and Labour Market Services Division [for more information, see Additional Resources].

Effective April 2, 2012, LMDA programs have been incorporated into the new Employment Program of British Columbia (EPBC) and no longer exist as stand-alone programs. 

Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy (ASETS)

Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy (ASETS), previously Aboriginal Human Resources Development Agreement (AHRDA), is designed to help Aboriginal people prepare for and find sustainable jobs.  [See Additional Resources for a list of ASETS Agreement-holders.]  All Aboriginal people, regardless of status or location, may access ASETS programs and services, which include services similar to EPBC.  Clients identified for formal referral to EPBC may choose whether to receive services from EPBC, ASETS or both.

Where appropriate the ministry will approve Aboriginal clients in the following categories to participate in a full-time or part-time unfunded non-ministry program offered by an ASETS holder: Persons with Persistent Multiple Barriers (PPMB), Persons with Disabilities (PWD), Expected to Work (ETW) and Expected to Work-Medical Condition (ETW-MC).  This will allow clients to participate in these programs and improve their employability while being able to continue to receive assistance.

Ministry approval is not required if a client’s participation in a part-time unfunded program of study does not affect the conditions of their EP or their employment-related obligations (i.e., participation in EPBC).  For example, a client could participate in a part-time evening or weekend course without affecting their employment obligations.

In order to receive ministerial approval of participation in an ASETS-approved program, the Basic Criteria and Program Criteria must be met.

Basic Criteria:

To receive ministerial approval, the client must:
 

  • demonstrate that the program/intervention is part of a realistic, achievable plan that could move them toward sustainable employment
  • commit to completing the program
  • provide progress updates to the ministry
  • receive prior approval of the ministry to participate in the program, and
  • have their participation noted in the EP 

Program Criteria:

To receive ministerial approval, the program must:
 

  • focus on moving the client along the ministry’s Employment Continuum by increasing the client’s employability
  • have a clear commencement and completion date
  • not exceed 52 weeks in length (does not include reasonable pauses – e.g., short-term medical condition) unless ASETS agreement-holders deem necessary for a client to extend the programs.

When an ASETS-funded program is equal to an EPBC program, or more appropriate, the ministry will refer clients to programs and interventions provided by ASETS agreement holders prior to referring to other ministry programs.  The ASETS agreement holder will determine if a client can participate in their programs.  In most cases the referral should be made prior to a client participating in other employment programs. 

If an Aboriginal PPMB, PWD, ETW or ETW-MC client participating in EPBC informs the EPBC service provider of their desire to enter an ASETS approved program, the EPBC service provider, in consultation with the EAW, will release the client.  All Aboriginal clients participating in or receiving supports from ASETS approved programs retain their employment plan obligations.  [For more information, see Additional Resources – List of ASETS agreement holders]

[For students attending post-secondary school, see Related Links – Education and Training, for more information]

Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities

The Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities is administered by Service Canada.  This program funds projects that assist persons with disabilities in preparing for, obtaining, and keeping employment or becoming self-employed.  To be eligible as a participant, it is not a requirement that an individual have the persons with disability designation under the Employment and Assistance for Persons with Disabilities Act.  Unemployed individuals who are legally entitled to work in Canada and who self-identify as having a disability may be eligible to participate in a project. 

The fund may support an array of activities, such as encouraging employers to hire workers with disabilities, increasing the employment skills of persons with disabilities, providing work experience, and assisting individuals with starting their own business.  Funds may be available to participants to assist with approved costs relating to their participation in funded projects.  [For more information, see Additional Resources – Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities.]

Youth Employment Strategy

Under the Youth Employment Strategy, Service Canada offers the following three programs:
 

  • Career Focus provides funding for employers to help post-secondary graduates obtain career-related work opportunities in Canada to support their development of advanced skills, to help them make career-related links to the job market, and to assist them in becoming leaders in their field.
  • Skills Link provides funding to community organizations to help youth facing barriers to employment – such as single parents, Aboriginal youth, young persons with disabilities, recent immigrants, youth living in rural and remote areas and high school dropouts – to develop the broad range of skills, knowledge and work experience they need to participate in the job market.
  • Canada Summer Jobs provides wage subsidies to employers to create summer employment for secondary and post-secondary students, and support the operation of summer employment offices.

Effective:  April 2, 2012

Apprenticeship Training

Apprenticeship training in BC comes under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of Jobs, Tourism and Skills Training and is administered by the Industry Training Authority (ITA).  Clients interested in apprenticeships should contact the ITA for more information, or enquire at their local WorkBC Employment Services Centre. [See Additional Resources – Industry Training Authority]

BladeRunners

BladeRunners is an employment program funded under the Canada-BC Labour Market Agreement that works in partnership with Ministry of Jobs, Tourism and Innovation (MJTI), the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy (ASETS) agreement holders, Service Canada and various industry partners.

BladeRunners assists multi-barriered and disadvantaged youth aged 19–30 to gain on-the-job construction training and apprenticeships.  The BladeRunners program seeks to:

  • provide meaningful work experiences that will result in long-term attachment to the workforce
  • build on existing success with other community-based programs and establish partnerships with organizations that share similar goals and objectives
  • provide youth with the entry level skills needed for successful employment and apprenticeship in the construction industry

Youth (ages 19 – 30) who meet the following requirements may be eligible for support through BladeRunners:
 

  • are physically healthy and capable of trades-related labour
  • have a demonstrated interest in trades and construction
  • demonstrate good basic English language skills
  • are free from any form of substance abuse
  • have received a satisfactory assessment from a local BladeRunners coordinator

[For more information, see Additional Resources – BladeRunners.]

Procedures

Effective: July 10, 2014

Clients with employment obligations will be identified through the ICM system for formal ministry referral to the Employment Program of British Columbia (EPBC).  Clients who are not formally referred to the EPBC can be encouraged to access the EPBC self-serve services.  While non-referred clients will generally be given an Employment Plan (EP) for Supervised Independent Work Search (SIWS), they may be referred to other non-ministry programs as appropriate, such as ASETS, BladeRunners, Adult Basic Education, etc.  [see Related Links – Employment Program of BC]

To refer clients to non-ministry funded employment programs available in the community, follow these steps:
 

  1. Follow locally established referral procedures for the particular program.
  2. Create an EP in the system for the program as appropriate.
  3. Ensure the client signs the EP and understands their responsibilities to comply with their EP. 
  4. Provide a copy of the EP or Voluntary Participation Plan to the client and scan, profile and place a copy where required.

Aboriginal PPMB, PWD, ETW or ETW-MC clients participating in an ASETS-approved program will need to provide the following information and/or documentation from the ASETS agreement-holder in order for ministry staff to verify involvement and progress:
 

  • Name of ASETS agreement-holder and contact information
  • Name of program
  • Description and nature of program/intervention
  • Program Start and End dates
  • Full-or part-time hours
  • Intended program outcomes
  • Any allowances and wage subsides
  • Other participation forms

ASETS agreement-holders may provide ministry clients with updates on their progress in an ASETS-approved program to be submitted to the EAW.  Clients are responsible for providing the ministry with updates on their progress.