BC Corrections, Adult Custody Division

As corrections professionals, we provide safe and secure custody of adult inmates and deliver programs that promote public safety and reduce re-offending.

A Critical Role

The correctional officer is vital to fulfilling the mission of the British Columbia Corrections Branch, Adult Custody Division. With nine provincial correctional centres across British Columbia, our correctional officers can work in a variety of settings. Whatever you're looking for, you might just find it with BC Corrections.

As the primary contact for inmates, the correctional officer works directly with offenders. This gives the correctional officer in-depth knowledge of an inmate's personality and behaviourvital to maintaining the security of the institution. At the same time, this knowledge supports and assists in planning inmate's successful reintegration into society.

Privilege & responsibility of a peace officer

Provincial correctional officers are peace officers. They possess a belief in the values of the BC Public Service, the flexibility and desire to work within a team, the ability to thrive in a demanding work environment, and, most importantly, the motivation to work with offenders.

Is this role for you?

Find out if becoming a correctional officer is the right career path for you. Contact a recruiter by email to learn more about upcoming information sessions.

Correctional Officer Information Sessions

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

  • 6 pm to 9 pm               
  • Location: JIBC Auditorium- New Westminster

Saturday, October 22, 2016

  • 10 am to 1 pm
  • Location: JIBC Auditorium- New Westminster

Saturday, November 26, 2016

  • 10 am to 1 pm
  • Location: JIBC Auditorium- New Westminster

Saturday, January 7, 2017  

  • 10 am to 1 pm
  • Location: JIBC Auditorium- New Westminster

Tuesday, January 24, 2017

  • 6 pm to 9 pm              
  • Location: JIBC Auditorium- New Westminster

Saturday, February 18, 2017 

  • 10 pm to 1 pm
  • Location: JIBC Auditorium- New Westminster

A closer look

  • Competitive salary
  • Envied benefit and pension package
  • Student loan forgiveness program and scholarships available
  • Training Partner with the Justice Institute of British Columbia
  • Opportunity to make a difference in your community maintaining public safety 

Workforce profile

Discover more about our workforce with this detailed profile (PDF, 127KB). View our information poster (PDF, 528KB) to learn more about the role of a corrections officer for the BC Public Service.

Learn more: videos

Watch these videos to learn more about a job in BC Corrections, or read a video transcript. Please note that the web address given at the end of the videos is outdated.

Questions?

You may have more questions than this site can answer. Each correctional centre has a dedicated recruitment officer, someone who's done the job and has the answersthey're here to help.

If you have a strong sense of ethics, excellent interpersonal skills and the ability to work and learn in a team environment, we'd like to hear from you.

Corrections officers are needed in

Correctional Officer – Prince George Correctional Centre
Closes October 10, 2016

Correctional Officer – Surrey PreTrial Centre
Closes September 6, 2016

Correctional Officer Applicant Inventory – Lower Mainland (Chilliwack, Surrey, Port Coquitlam, Maple Ridge)
Closes September 25, 2016

Please visit BC Public Service Job Postings for other opportunities.

Video Transcripts

Do You Have What it Takes?

0:06. Greg, security officer: “You know, I moved away from home when I was fifteen to play hockey and then done it until I was thirty-eight years old and that’s all I really kind of knew. And so, I was looking  for something outside hockey that really piqued my interest. This is almost the same team concept, and a lot of variety every day at work, and so it really interested me.

“I was a professional hockey player for sixteen years and then moved into coaching junior hockey, and then found my way into corrections.

“The way society is going now, I don’t know how many people have the same job like they used to have. It’s a very interesting place to work. You have days just like anywhere else, but if you have the mindset that you can help people and you enjoy doing that, then I think you can have a very fulfilling career here.”

0:58: Anne, correctional officer: “Well, I have a lot of leadership skills that I brought over.  I led a crew in forestry for many years. I love the team aspect of it. Every day is different. Every day is something new. There is always a challenge there. And communication is a big way of dealing with that.”

1:21: Catelin, correctional officer: “I was born in Romania. I worked as an engineer in Romania. And then I came in Canada and finally I did my passion, building musical instruments [plays two notes on the violin string]. What is very, very good for me and what I appreciate is that the hours in corrections allow me to pursue my hobby also.

“Before I came into corrections, I had lots of contacts with all kinds of cultures, all kinds of backgrounds. You meet lots of people in corrections. You have challenges, like, you have to understand them, listen to them. Some of them have a totally different culture than your culture or my culture. It’s amazing how being with them you realize we are all the same and we have to help each other.”

2:10: Kevin, correctional officer: “Well I had my own business for about ten years, myself and my wife. We decided that we had to close down the business and I had to start looking for other options.

“[In business] I learned how to be creative and how to be highly efficient and I learned how to self-motivate.

“So I had always been interested in law enforcement and I’d always been interested in serving others, so  I wanted to be a public service and a friend of mine told me they were looking for corrections officers.

“After ten years in my own business, I have a lot of life experience that I bring to the job every day, as well as perspective”

2:41: Rose, correctional supervisor: “Before I joined corrections, I spent ten years as a certified dental assistant. I was dealing with people that were uncomfortable in their situation, so I had to try to help them to relax, try to understand what emotions they were feeling.

“Ever since I was little, I’ve wanted to be in some kind of law enforcement. It’s a rewarding job, with the changes that you do make once in a while with inmates. And you just work with really great people – your fellow staff and all the different agencies that you work with. Every day is a different day.”

3:19: Donovon, correctional officer: “I wanted something a little more career oriented, um, something with a better basis as far as benefits. After twenty years in the service industry, it was just time for something new.

“I like the shift pattern that I heard about- four on, four off. That appealed to me. There’s lots of room for advancement and lots of room to move around. I’ve only been in for two and a half years; as of next year, I think I will have worked in every area and covered so much ground. And, uh, I’ll be running the show in about another five, I’d say (smirks).”

Text on screen: If you have a strong sense of integrity, excellent interpersonal skills and the ability to work and learn in a team environment, we’d like to hear from you.

Women Working in Corrections – BC

Nicole, correctional officer, driving, to kids in a back seat: “No, we don’t want any extensions. You’ve got to get it done. And you’ve got soccer tonight, which reminds me that I’m going to drop you off at soccer….”

Nicole, to interviewer: “I was a bartender for almost ten years. As much as I would love to believe that you could major and bartending and retire on the benefits, no, not so much. I wanted a long-term career. I wanted something that had, like, more of an education to it. I wanted to take some courses and get something under my belt. I wanted a job that I could be proud of, that I could put on a uniform in the morning and tell my kids, look, Mom’s going to work.

“A lot of the things I used as a bartender come in handy in corrections. I set boundaries. And the other one is planning ahead and solving problems – I use that all the time in corrections all the time. I’m on the living unit and I’m working and I have to stay one step ahead.”

0:57: Lena, correctional officer: “Before I came into corrections I was actually working in the restaurant industry for probably about seven, eight years. And I was just kind of hoping to get into something more meaningful. You get to know them pretty well. Going out on escorts, being as it’s just  one-on-one, or myself and another officer, they kind of let their guard down and they get to talk to you about  why they’re here.

“I’m not going to pretend I’m six feet tall and two hundred pounds. The inmates, when I come onto unit, they know that. They’re like, oh, it’s you. They know I’m small. I don’t pretend to be anything else. And they just accept that. I am myself and they are themselves. They know I’m here to do a job. As long as you’re confident and you believe in yourself when you’re doing it, you’re going to be fine.”

1:37: Cheryl, correctional officer: “Originally, I’m from New Zealand. I came to Vancouver, BC, over twenty years ago. I decided to choose to pursue a career in corrections after raising my own family.

“I think at first, my kids probably thought I was crazy. But I think my children now, they’re very, very poud of the fact that I’m a correctional officer. They are very proud to tell their friends that their mother does this for a living, and of course they always get the same reaction: your mother’s a correctional officer?

“I don’t think there is a typical look for a  correctional officer. It’s your mom, it’s your next door neighbour, it’s somebody that was a bank teller or somebody that worked at a grocery store, even lawyers. So different professions come…”

2:18: For the five years before I joined here, I was at the Victoria airport as a pre-board screener in security, and before that I was at home with my children until my youngest went to kindergarten, so I was at home for about 13 years.

“I am a case manager and that entails sentence planning and release planning. We are kind of the link between the guys and the outside world.The main objective is to make it as easy as possible to sort out the details of their life so they can get in back to society.”

2:48: Leah, correctional officer: “I was a single mom and owning a business has its own set of problems – working all the time and not enough money to do things I wanted to do and take the kids where I wanted to take them. I just wanted a career, you know, something that I could do differently that was going to give me a life. I’ve learned a lot of things – I’ve taken a lot of courses and I’ve gotten a lot of chances to do things I never would have done.”

3:16: Marlene, deputy warden:  “I’ve been in corrections twenty-four years. I started out in a youth correctional center and I’ve made my way through to adult and now I am acting deputy warden at Nanaimo Correctional Centre.

“As a correctional officer, there are so many different positions you can work and there are opportunities for everyone.

“Balanced life to me has been very important. I need to keep my focus on my family, and it has been helpful to do that working shift work.  I find that I have consecutive day to be at home and with the children, and that was a real strength.”

3:52: Debbi, assistant deputy warden: “I’ve got to work all three custody levels. And almost exactly two years ago, I applied for the assistant deputy warden position here in charge of capital projects, which is building the new women’s facility out front, and I have been doing that religiously for two years. I have loved every minutes of it. It has been challenging, it has been exciting. It’s been exhausting. But I have learned so much and I would never, ever give up an opportunity like this if it was offered again.  It’s been a ride. I love what I do. Every day I love coming to work. I get up in the morning [and] I don’t cringe that, oh, man, I have to go to work today. I actually embrace it. I think every day is a new day, especially doing project work within the provincial government. I am learning things that I would never learn doing any other job.”

”Every day is a new day, especially doing project work in the provincial government. I’m learning things I would never learn doing another job. “

Text on screen: If you have a strong sense of integrity, excellent interpersonal skills and the ability to work and learn in a team environment, we’d like to hear from you.

Vancouver Island Regional Correctional Centre

0:12. Gillian, correctional officer: “The oldest jail in British Columbia, this was constructed in 1913. At the end of the war, in 1920, it was converted into a psychiatric hospital. After that, it was known as Wilkinson Road Working Camp, where the inmates had livestock here and also grew their own fruits and vegetables. In the late 1970s, early 1980s, the rest of the building was constructed, which is now known as the Vancouver Island Regional Correctional Centre.”

Text on screen: BC Corrections is part of the BC Public Service, the largest employer in the province

0:42. Eric, correctional officer : “I came from back east, decided to change careers, got married, and at the age of 38 decided to join corrections. It was a challenging area that I appreciated. I wanted to give back to the community, to try to make a difference trying to prevent people from re-offending, and there are different ways of doing this.”

1:05. Claudio, correctional officer: “One of the programs they offer at VCC is the bike course program, where bikes that come from communities, that get abandoned and come from police, arrive over here and get repaired and we ship them to Africa for charity.”

1:19: Text on screen: BC has nine correctional centres throughout the province

1:19: Eric: “We teach them the skills, life skills, basically – how to budget themselves, how to apply for a job, how to communicate properly.”

1:28: Inmate, in a group program: “I don’t want to be in jail no more. I want to learn to survive on the outside of here. I don’t know day by day if I’m every going to be able to beat my habit. Because it’s a habit. And it haunts me. It scares me.”

1:42. Eric: “We try to help them with better education, with programs, to try to make a difference, to prevent people from re-offending.”

1:48. Group program leader to group: “It’s you that you’re working on, and when you start to recognize that, like you said, and become very self-aware, and you start to recognize and be happy with who you are, you are going to find change is just going to be able to happen.”

1:59. Eric. “These skills that we take for granted, a lot of the inmate population do not have. It’s challenging, but it’s rewarding as well.”

2:12. Gillian: “Corrections is a different job than other people may have. We don’t sit at a desk all day.  We don’t write papers all day.”

2:19. Scene: correctional officers getting training in a gym. Coach: “Weapon strike, straight strike, good form, good power, good commands. And on the bags – approach!”

Officers, training: “Hiya! Hiya!”

Coach: “Good, good. Reset, to your lines.”

2:34. Text on screen: BC Corrections pays for the training you need to become a correctional officer

2:37. Eric: “We do have a team spirit that is very important. Those crucial instances, like when there’s a code or an emergency as such, everyone molds together and, really, you can feel the team spirit, and it’s important because really we are the front-liners when it comes to dealing with inmates.”

2:54. Gillian: “A huge part about being a correctional officer is being able to communicate. We work in a very stressful environment – it is important that your message is clear, that you are open and you’re understanding.”

2:57: Text on screen: Through Pacific Leaders, BC Corrections offers BC Student Loan forgiveness and scholarships to continue your education

3:05. Eric: “So, if you are considering a career in corrections, the number one quality you need is integrity. We are agents of change, basically. We are trying to prevent recidivism, with newer techniques, so it is very important, I think. “

3:21. Gillian: “There’s great opportunities for advancement. There are great opportunities for training. So the person that would be best suited here is someone who is excited about learning lots of new things and have that energy to kind of jump in where they can.”

Text on screen: If you have a strong sense of integrity, excellent interpersonal skills and the ability to work and learn in a team environment, we’d like to hear from you.

BC Corrections COPAT – Correctional Officer Physical Abilities Test

0:08. Text on screen: For years, BC Corrections has been using the COPAT as a screening tool in the Correctional Officer recruitment process.

0:11. Male correctional officer :  “The COPAT gives an opportunity to evaluate our candidate. We’ll notice that those that do come in in good shape, physical fitness-wise, it shows that they’ve prepared themselves.”

0:20. Text on screen: The test was developed based on what a correctional officer is likely to encounter in their work.

0:23. Female correctional officer: “If physical activity is part of your regular life anyway, it will be easier. And, if it’s not part of your day to day, then really some preparation would be needed.”

0:30. Text on screen: You have 2 minutes and 50 seconds to complete the timed portion of a 7 station course.

0:34. Text on screen: A correctional officer needs to be able to GET TO THE PROBLEM and then RESOLVE THE PROBLEM. The COPAT tests your ability to do that.

0:42. Sounds of officers running. Text on screen: START & RUN. 50 FEET.

0:47. Female correctional officer. “Oftentimes, by the time you have arrived at a situation, you have come quite a distance, possibly several steps of stairs, and you could be quite winded by the time you get there. And it’s important that you still have lots left to deal with the situation, no matter what it might be.”

1:00. Text on screen: STAIR RUN

1:04. Second male correctional officer: “When you get there, it’s not just about getting there. That’s often when the work begins.”

1:08. Images of a fight between inmates. Officer shouting: “Break it up. Break it up!”

1:10. Scene of officer being tested in a gym. Tester counting: “Five, four…”

1:11. First male correctional officer: “You start preparing by doing some cardio, some running, some upper body workouts. That would definitely help them out with the process.”

1:17. Gym test scene. Tester: “Three-sixty –”

1:18. Text on screen: MOBILITY, AGILITY & SPEED RUN

1:19. Female correctional officer: “The obstacle portion of the COPAT is quite relevant because when a situation arises that you need to respond to, it could be in any area of the center, for example if you’ve got equipment or possibly confined spaces.”

1:32. “You’ll find that people that keep themselves in physical fitness, that work out regularly, that eat properly, there’s also a correlation to mental alertness as well.” [Text on screen: PUSH  STATION] “When you talk about responding to codes, that once you get there is when the work actually starts – that’s when you have to think what is going on, what should I be doing, listen to direction, follow direction from your supervisor.” [Text on screen: PULL STATION 50lbs] “If you arrive there and you’re exhausted, your mental alertness will be down.” [MODIFIED SQUAT Thrust and stand.]

1:56. Female correctional officer: “Your stress will be less if you feel more confident. So, the more confident that you are with your abilities, the less stressed you might feel just in your day to day work. Also, the stress reduction benefits that come out of doing physical activity – there is definitely that confidence when you’re at work that if something became physical, that you’d have the energy and the strength to not only just defend yourself, but also to manage the situation in a safe way, whether that’s controlling inmates or supporting other staff - whatever the situation is, that added confidence comes with a fitness level.”

2:31. Tester: “One more, on your back. OK, on your feet, on your feet! Up on your feet! Good job.”

Text on screen: COME PREPARED. BRING YOUR DRIVER’S LICENSE and SIGNED MEDICAL FORM. WEAR GOOD RUNNERS AND SHOW UP EARLY.

2:53: Tester: Good job! Good job!

Surrey Pretrial Services Centre

[Music]

0:15. Dennis, correctional officer: “Surrey Pretrial is a medium-sized center that currently is moving to becoming one of the largest centers in the province.  We house a variety of different inmates, from high risk to low risk -- lots of opportunites for people to look at occupations and a possible career.

Text on screen: BC Corrections is part of the BC Public Service, the largest employer in the province

0:38. Dennis: “The records administration department is an extremely busy area. You have to be able to multi-task, work quickly, and also understand the technical side of it. And then be able to react to stressful situations that could happen in the holding cells. You have to be able to think on your feet and have a high skill level.”

1:01. Bob, correctional officer: “There’s approximately twenty-four inmates in the work program, called the maintenance work program. We do woodwork, we do repairing televisions, repairing microwaves, we do the cleaners, the floor guys, maintenance workers, painters. We make clothes here for the inmates, i.e. the reds. Some of these guys come in my program and have no skills whatsoever. They get to work around people who have skills, who pass them on to them.”

Text on screen: BC has nine correctional centres throughout the province

1:30. Dennis: “The perception I had was very misleading. I was told that the inmates don’t talk to you, you don’t talk to them. That is not true. This is not just a segregated inmate-guard type of atmosphere.”

1:41. Bob: “When this program started a few years ago, it was a very small unit. We have now expanded it and we hope to expand it more. Because we like to get more inmates off the units, to give them more skills.   They enjoy coming down here because they want to keep busy and they want to learn new things and they’ll learn new things every single day.”

Text on screen: BC Corrections pays for the training you need to become a correctional officer

2:00. Dennis: “Teamwork is paramount, working in corrections. Not only to make the job a better environment but we are relying on each other for safety. We do work with dangerous offenders in this institution so we have to be aware of our surroundings -- we have to have really good communication skills. And then throw on top of that, we have to have a bit of empathy. Not everyone has those skills. You have to be a special person to be able to do this job and do it successfully. It’s not a one-man show here, you have to pull your weight – it’s like a bunch of people on a boat, we all have to row, we all have to do what we have to do to accomplish our goal. With the new technology that’s coming in, it’s going to demand more technical skills from a correctional officer, which will open up doors and avenues for people coming in that have those skills – multi-tasking,  being technically effective and knowing how to operate systems is going to be really, really important. For someone who has those skills, it’s an ideal situation to come into, that you could only get from working in corrections.”

3:08. Text on screen: If you have a strong sense of ethics, excellent interpersonal skills, and the ability to work and learn in a team environment, we’d like to hear from you.

North Fraser Pretrial Center

[Music]

0:11. Gerald, correctional officer:  “Basically what appeals to me is I wanted to do something where I could build bonds and camaraderie, and corrections shows me that type of teamwork and bonding.”

0:22. Katja, correctional officer: “To be successful in corrections, you are going to want to have a lot of self-confidence.  But you need to believe in yourself and also the people around you.”

0:31. Officer training scene. Trainer: “Remember when you hear ‘blue’, stop.” Trainer identifies roles for the role play: “Inmate. Officer.”

0:38. Katja: “I mean, we back each other up every single day. So, I need to know that I’m making the right choice and I need to know that the people that stand behind me are also making the right choices.”

Trainer: “Go!” Officer: “Get your arms out! Get your arms out! Put your arms behind your back.”

Text on screen: BC is part of the BC Public Service, the largest employer in the province.

Danette, correctional officer: “The training process is very, very rigorous. They put you through your paces. You learn how to defend yourself, how to take care of yourself. And they give you the abilities you need to work a unit of sixty inmates to make sure you’re safe.”

Gerald: “Basically, when we deal with people, it’s always about presence. From presence we go into communication and from there whatever level of force you need on a scale. So, basically, communication is very huge.”

Training scene. Trainer: “OK, go out together. Good.” Applause.

Text on screen: BC has nine correctional centers throughout the province

1:23. Danette: “The fact that if anything goes sideways, there’s twelve to fourteen people through your door in less than four and a half seconds. Very safe. The teamwork is incredible.  What attracted me to corrections was the opportunity to work with offenders that were possibly in for the first time, to give them the opportunity to turn their life around, and not stay in the system, to get out and live an active life.”

Text on screen: BC Corrections pays for the training you need to become a correctional officer

1:43. Katja: “There are several different things. We have sewing, we have laundry, we have a maintenance program where we have several inmates keeping the place tidy. We have different painting projects.  There are opportunities to move throughout the jail in different posts and really get to work with the inmates.”

1:58. Gerald: “It’s actually interesting. I mean, every day is new. It’s not like your standard, typical desk job.”

2:03. Katja: “You have tons of support from all the staff around you. And you get to debrief with them every day and you get to have lots of laughs. And it isn’t always as serious as you think it is.”

2:16. Officer training. Trainer: “March!” Officers (marching)”One, two, one two...”

2:27. Katja: “Corrections is more than just sitting on a living unit and watching inmates. It is a career. There are different shift patterns that you can have in corrections. There’s a four and four pattern. There’s a five and two. There’s four and two. So it gives you a lot of freedom depending on how you want to do your work hours.”

Text on screen:  Through Pacific Leaders, BC Corrections offers BC Student Loan forgiveness and scholarships to continue your education

2:46. Danette. “There is so much opportunity to move up and across the board, transferring to different centers, if you like, wherever you need to go.”

2:53. Gerald: “Everything is always unique. If you want to experience that and have an open mindset, then pretty much you can develop the skills on the job.”

3:00. Katja: “In the hallways, on the units, during break times, I look forward to coming to work every day.”

3:08. Text on screen: If you have a strong sense of ethics, excellent interpersonal skills, and the ability to work and learn in a team environment, we’d like to hear from you.

Nanaimo Correctional Centre

[Music]

0:16. Correctional officer to inmates, working outside with fire hoses: “Make sure it’s flushed good, eh?” Inmate: “Yup.” Officer:  “How long are you guys in for? Six months? OK, you’re going to see fire season, so pay attention to what’s going on. A hose can have up to three patches…”

0:25. Julie, correctional officer: “I’ve worked in corrections for just over four years.  Working in Guthrie, as being the only therapeutic community in a jail in Canada, I take pride in being a part of that.”

0:38. Riel, correctional officer: “One of the reasons I got into corrections was to help people and give back. And, to be honest, I was working in the hospitality industry, and had one child with one on the way, and I needed something that was a little more secure.”

0:51. James, correctional officer: “I came straight out of school. It was either RCMP or here, and corrections came through right away, so I put RCMP on the back burner and never really looked back.”

1:02. Riel: “Surprisingly, after the first week or so on the job, I realized that a lot of the skills I had were transferable. As long as you could deal with people, as long as you could problem solve, keep your cool, you really had no problem.”

Text on screen: BC Corrections is part of the BC Public Service, the largest employer in the province

1:15. Julie: “Guthrie is very different than a lot of other jails. It’s medium security but here the guys have the ability to walk around.  They live in different houses on the unit and just have a little bit more freedom than what they’re used to. Some might look at this unit and think, yes, it is easy time, and that’s just not the case, these guys are in classes throughout the day, in counselling throughout the day, working on themselves. It’s much harder to be here because of all the things that are expected of you. Here is where you have to work on yourself.”

Text on screen: BC Corrections has nine correctional centres throughout the province

1:54. Riel: “What I do as a case manager when the guys come in they see myself or one of my partners and we do an assessment on them and we make sure they are pointed in the right direction. It’s not just about warehousing; it’s about making them productive members of society.”

2:09. Darcy, correctional officer: “The fellahs are given some meaningful work. I run a crew of between twenty and thirty fellahs during the summer. Our job is to unpack the hoses for forestry, test them to make sure there are no burns in them, re-wrap them, re-box them, and send them back to the ministry of forests. The fellahs actually see they’re doing something, they’re doing some good for the province and they do get a lot of recognitions. We’ve got letters from fellahs that have actually worked on the fire line that express their appreciation for what we do.”

2:38. Cory, instructor: “What I enjoy the most about this the most is you will take an inmate that has almost no experience with carpentry, and in some cases don’t know how to read a tape measurer, and teach them how to build a doghouse. The particular inmate that built that had no idea how to read a tape measurer when he first started. It is about learning a new skill, and his plan was to be able to take it with him when he left, to find a job.”

Text on screen: BC Corrections pays for the training you need to become a correctional officer

3:11. Julie: “To work in corrections it’s very different than other forms of law enforcement. I mean, we don’t carry weapons. As you can see, my unit is very open. We don’t have the ability to lock down people. So communication skills are very important.”

3:27. James: “So, if you’re thinking of a job in corrections, I think it’s important to remain open. I’ve worked in maintenance, carpentry, the records department. I work on the highways crews presently, taking the inmates off-site to do work for the department of highways. The dynamics of this place, it keeps you on your toes.”

Text on screen: Through Pacific Leaders, BC Corrections offers BC Student Loan forgiveness and scholarships to continue your education.

4:33. Darcy: “I think I have probably one of the best jobs in the province. On a beautiful sunny day, you can’t beat it. And even in the middle of the winter.”

3:52. Cory: “Overall it’s a really good place to work. You get to deal with all kinds of different personalities. You get to work with really good staff members, and getting to teach incarcerated individuals new skills, and give them a sense of meaning, a sense of purpose – it’s a lot of fun.”

4:13. Text on screen: If you have a strong sense of ethics, excellent interpersonal skills, and the ability to work and learn in a team environment, we’d like to hear from you.

Kamloops Regional Correctional Centre

[Music, birdsong, circular saws.]

0:20. Woodshop. Inmate to instructor: This is a half-inch and those are three-eighths.

Instructor: Yeah, perfect.

Inmate: How are we going to attach them?

instructor: You want to brad nail them, glue them?

Inmate: Yes.

0:32. Sean, instructor: “Here at KCC, we have two shops. We have the metal shop and the carpentry shop. We run about twelve to fourteen inmates down here doing various projects, from storage sheds, fire pits, repair work for meal carts, and we also do projects for [Kamloops] Wildlife Park, setting  up for their wildlife display during the winter.”

Text on screen: BC Corrections is part of the BC Public Service, the largest employer in the province

1:02. Clayton, correctional officer: “At Kamloops Regional Correctional Centre, we run a variety of work programs. This is one of them – setting up the community gardens for the local people to do their gardening.”

Text on screen: BC has nine correctional centres throughout the province

1:13 Sean: “We get a lot of guys in here that haven’t had any trades or anything, and this just helps them as a stepping stone to where they might want to go. So we give them the basic knowledge of how to use the equipment, the safety around all the equipment, kind of prep them for if it’s something they want to pursue on the outside.”

1:34. Instructor to inmate, working in wood shop: “We’ll utilize them long-ways, for the top and the bottom.” Inmate: “Yeah.” Instructor: “Carry on, you know what you’re doing.”

Text on screen: BC Corrections pays for the training you need to become a correctional officer

1:50. Pamela, correctional officer: “Before I got into corrections, I worked for the airlines. And I originally wanted to use corrections as a stepping stone for policing. And once I got into corrections, I decided that this was something that I really enjoyed and something that I really wanted to do.”

Text on screen:  Through Pacific Leaders, BC Corrections offers BC Student Loan forgiveness and scholarships to continue your education

Office: Pamela to a second officer: “He actually wants to move to Penticton. He needs his probation order changed, so how I go about doing that?” Officer: “When that happens, basically you have to get…”

2:14. Pamela: “One of my favourite things to do, as the mental health liaison officer, is to work with all the different outside agencies -  working with forensics, probation, RCMP, psych nurses, street nurses, the community comes together to help inmates with their release planning, to help ensure that they are set up for their release, that they have something to go to, rather than nothing. I would absolutely recommend a career in corrections to anyone who was thinking of it. You work with all kinds of people, you work as a team, there are plenty of opportunities. I have learned so much. I’ve grown as a person, had the opportunity to work different types of work, different types of shiftwork. The opportunities are plentiful.”

3:02. Text on screen: If you have a strong sense of ethics, excellent interpersonal skills, and the ability to work and learn in a team environment, we’d like to hear from you.

Fraser Regional Correctional Centre

[Music]

0:22. Matt (unseen), correctional officer: “Fraser Regional is a multi-security level facility with open, medium and secure levels, and we also have remand inmates.”

0:32. Izach, correctional officer: “I’m a program facilitator here at Fraser Regional. And I enjoy my position because it allows me to facilitate programs to our inmates they wouldn’t otherwise be able to receive. I try to impart some type of positivism to the inmates, you know, a little bit of hope here and there doesn’t hurt anybody. And if I can impart that on them, maybe it will be good for society in general.”

1:01. Matt: “I get these guys prepared for work. This particular range, this unit, we’re the maintenance unit. These guys get paid on a weekly basis. We provide the cleanliness for the institution and then they are sent off to a maintenance area where another officer will basically assign them tasks.

Text on screen: BC has nine correctional centres throughout the province

1:29. Matt: “We have outside word programs and outside work crews, such as [indistinguishable] ranch, fisheries, the tree program, and then we have crews going out to the fairgrounds and do maintenance on their lawns. We have a metal shop – it’s a full shop with machines and welding, blowtorches, everything. We have a full carpentry program. We have a carpenter that’s contracted out and he comes in and helps the guys and they can get their ticket here.”

1:53. Izach: “We also provide vocational programs. And I’ve been lucky enough to be selected as a facilitator for hazards recognition, WHMIS [Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System], fall protection – so some of these skills that I can facilitate and certify them for allows them to be equipped with certificates that they can use in the workforce or in the field.”

Text on screen: BC Corrections pays for the training you need to become a correctional officer

2:26. Matt: “I’ve been in corrections for two years. What appealed to me was when I started and first got hired on, I was guaranteed full-time work, and I started on a four on, four off. I get the feeling when I come into work that I’m part of a team and we work together and it’s a pretty positive atmosphere, we have fun together. You have people to talk to when you have tough days at work.”

Text on screen: Through Pacific Leaders, BC Corrections offers BC Student Loan forgiveness and scholarships to continue your education.

2:55. Matt: “Doing this job, it really helps to have a strong sense of self, awareness. You may find yourself in a particular situation and really discover who you are. It will come out. These guys will make it come out.”

3:02. Matt: “You don’t always have a supervisor looking over your shoulder, so you have to know how to manage your time well. Being able to stay honest, not only with yourself but with your job, too.”

3:13. Text on screen: If you have a strong sense of ethics, excellent interpersonal skills, and the ability to work and learn in a team environment, we’d like to hear from you.

Ford Mountain Correctional Centre

[Acoustic guitar music]

0:21. Correctional officers at morning muster. Officer: “Good morning, everybody. Miss Whitehead, I believe you wanted to talk about the new hall layout since we moved inmates over there.” Ms. Whitehead: “So this morning at breakfast I was asking some of the guys how it went last night. All reports were good, everything was working, appliances…”

0:37. Catherine, correctional officer: “I actually love my job and what I do and the work that I do with the guys. I’m the mental health liaison, so I do a lot of one on one work and programs and help them succeed while they’re in the institution and also help them prepare for their release into the community.”

Text on screen: BC Corrections is part of the BC Public Service, the largest employer in the province

0:58. Steve, correctional officer: “Here at Ford Mountain, every inmate will have a job. Everybody works here. Cutting firewood for the local campgrounds, for specialty restaurants like the Keg, Pizza Oven, etc. We have a machine shop here in Ford Mountain where we service all of our own machinery when we have an inmate mechanic in that is working for us. We also have a contract with forestry where we service all of the firefighting tools in the off-season of fire season. Also, we have a mill here where we mill all of our own lumber for any project that we’re working on here in camp. We also have a programs room there where they’re teaching a basic two by four and electrical course. The atmosphere is really relaxed because when these guys get out into the open, they can relax and calm down as opposed to being locked up where tensions are a lot higher and you can’t get out and take a walk when you want to. These guys can take a breather, go for a walk, and blow off steam as opposed to being locked up with forty other guys.”

2:07. Catherine in a meeting with an inmate. “So, yesterday it was the pink shirt day, right. What did the anti-bullying day mean for you yesterday?” Inmate: “ It was hard because you have to open up. I was a target, years and years ago, because of my colour, and you know…”

2:24. Catherine: “As a correctional officer, you need to have patience and understanding and be open-minded and realize that they’re here to heal and to become healthy, because the way you treat them while they’re in here is the way they’re going to treat others when they’re out.”

Text on screen: BC Corrections pays for the training you need to become a correctional officer

2:39. Catherine: “Corrections has provided me with so many opportunities. They also sent me to many different conferences, workshops, training opportunities in my field, so I’m able to bring in programs that support all the inmates. Like the literacy and the anti-bullying and the wellness series that I do. So it’s been a really great environment for personal and professional growth."

Text on screen: Through Pacific Leaders, BC Corrections offers BC Student Loan forgiveness and scholarships to continue your education

3:03. Steve: “I love my job here. This is an awesome environment. Look, I’m out in the wide open, I’m not locked up. I’ve got beautiful scenery. I can interact with several inmates at a time. It’s a very challenging job and I really like it here. “

3:21: Text on screen: If you have a strong sense of ethics, excellent interpersonal skills, and the ability to work and learn in a team environment, we’d like to hear from you.

Alouette Correctional Centre for Women

0:12. Bonnie, correctional officer: “Alouette Correctional Centre is really unique. It has an open medium camp as well as open houses where the women have the opportunity to go out into community and volunteer and work. As well as we have a new secure centre, which is maximum security. So it’s very unique in that way as well.”

0:31. Greenhouse, training program. Barb, instructor: “So what I need you ladies to do this morning is go through each container. These are seedlings that have been started with seeds collected here at the centre…”

0:41. Barb: “I have been the horticulture instructor for just over five years. We have anywhere from twenty to forty women that come to work every morning. We do a variety of things throughout the year, depending what month it is. We do vegetables every year, we do moss baskets, containers. These are a marble pepper which started from one small pepper, we broke it open, planted all the seeds….It’s been a passion all of my life so I’m lucky to come to work every day and teach something that I love to do and get to see the rewards of how the women feel in the end when they leave. It’s a great part of what we do here.”

Text on screen: BC Corrections is part of the BC Public Service, the largest employer in the province

1:19 Lisa: “It’s exciting. Yeah, no two days are the same. Which is one of the perks to it. I find you don’t get bored. There’s interactions with the inmates, interactions with the staff.

1:29 Workshop. Bonnie, facilitator: “Good morning, ladies. So, welcome. Today we’re going to talk about nutrition and your health…”

1:33. Bonnie: “So I chose to be a facilitator and assist the women with change by delivering core programs. Delivering core programs gives me the opportunity to assist them with the emotions and different things that are going on for them.”

Text on screen: BC Corrections pays for the training you need to become a correctional officer

1:49. Barb: “It’s really about motivating the women to get up in the morning, to get them thinking, to get them feeling good about themselves, building their self-esteem, learning a new skill, transferring a skill they may already have into something that’s more positive. When a woman says, thank you, I’ve learned a lot. I can’t believe I don’t want to leave, you know you’ve done amazing work.”

Text on screen: Through Pacific Leaders, BC Corrections offers BC Student Loan forgiveness and scholarships to continue your education.

2:19. Bonnie: “An ideal candidate for Alouette Correctional Centre for Women has great communication skills or somebody who wants to see change in what they’re doing, because it’s always changing.”

2:30. Lisa: “My dad, who was in corrections for 32 years, now retired, I don’t think I remember him ever coming home saying he hated his job or didn’t want to go back after days off, so that’s got to stand for something. There is a good balance for work and life outside of work, definitely. I find since being in corrections for the past four years it’s taught me how to communicate with people better, in my personal life as well.”

3:02. Barb: “I look it as I brought my life experience to corrections and what I learn in corrections helps me in life. Would I say to somebody, come in, and be a correctional officer? Sure. It’s a great career.”

Prince George Regional Correctional Centre

[Instrumental music}

0:23. Dan, correctional officer: “Prince George Regional Correctional Centre holds sentenced inmates, two years less a date, and also we hold remand inmates for court.

0:32. Office. Woman answers phone. “Women’s unit. Hi, how are you doing?”

0:36. Devon, correctional officer: “As far as working in a women’s unit goes, it’s been a great time to be here. We’re a relatively new addition to our centre. The way the unit is designed itself has been fantastic for the inmates. We used to be in cramped quarters. Now they have a big common area for when they feel like coming out to socialize, but they also have their own individual pods and cells where they can go for their quiet time, so I find that their stress level has been really reduced because they have choice of what they’d like to do.”

Text on screen: BC Corrections is part of the BC Public Service, the largest employer in the province

1:06. Robert, correctional officer: “I’m from the Lheidli T’enneh First Nation. I came into corrections four and a half years ago as a challenge for myself to work with the inmates and to help better theirselves and myself. And the reason the aboriginal program is so important (is) it helps the inmates understand their cultural and their spiritual side much better.”

1:24. Jason, instructor: “This is the visit center here in Prince George. This the area where we allow our inmates to participate in visits and re-connect with their families. At first I thought that the family members would be quite hostile towards me as a correctional officer, but I soon realized that they were quite appreciative of the work we do here, because it’s a source of stress relief for them, gives them a chance to re-connect with their families and maintain strong relationships.”

Text on screen: BC has nine correctional centres throughout the province

2:00. Devon: “Corrections is changing. While we always have rules to follow, we now have way more programming for women – they have more choices, more options...skills that they can take away and use in their lives on the outside.”

2:10. Robert: “I think it is beneficial to have an aboriginal liaison officer. I’ve lived out on these communities and I know I’ve seen what they’re going through. As an aboriginal person, that connection would be there to help them re-integrate back into their reserves and communities and such.”

Text on screen: BC Corrections pays for the training you need to become a correctional officer

2:26. Devon: “Corrections needs people full of integrity, innovation, those that aren’t afraid to step outside the box.”

2:31. Jason. “A successful correctional officer has a lot of life skills, (is)level-headed, and able to deal with yourself as opposed to just the inmates.”

Text on screen: Through Pacific Leaders, BC Corrections offers BC Student Loan forgiveness and scholarships to continue your education

2:43. Devon. “Working for corrections has been a very empowering career for me because I can decide which way I want my career to go. For the last few years, I’ve been raising a young family at home, so being a unit officer and working four on and four off has afforded me a lot of time with my family, more  than any other job would have.”

3:06. Robert: "It’s a fantastic place to work. I enjoy working with all the people here. The diversity I’ve been given in my career has been fantastic.”

 

 

 

BC Corrections

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