Conclusion of Operational Planning (module 5, p. 4)

Define the term, windthrow

There are five parts to the module closure — recall, transfer of learning, reflections, self-assessment quiz, and a celebration.

Recall

Are there other application recommendations that you think could be added? Name them.

In this module, there are two parts to recall — answering the set of questions listed at the beginning of the module, and summarizing the module.

A. The following questions were listed at the beginning of this module. Now that you have completed the module, (and without looking back) re-answer them. Are your answers more complete, now?
 

  1. Are you now familiar with biodiversity implications and operational planning — cutblock design?
  • If not, what do you have to do so that you are?
  • Where else can you go to find more information?
  1. Discuss biodiversity and operational planning — cutblock design.
  2. What is meant by the term, cutblock design?
  3. What are the general planning procedures for biodiversity management at the stand level?
  4. What do you know about windthrow?
  5. What are the windthrow considerations in patch planning?
  6. What are the windthrow considerations in riparian areas?

B. Use a summary chart to summarize this module. There are four headings.

Transfer of learning

  1. Think of ways you can adapt/modify any of the ideas from this module to your professional life.

Reflections

  1. What does this module tell you that you already knew before?
  2. What new information did you learn?

Complete the following comparison

  1. Operational planning — cutblock design is like an insect, because it's ___________

Now you write your own comparisons.

  1. Operational planning — cutblock design is like _________, because it's ______
  2. Operational planning — cutblock design is like _________, because it's ______