News

Check out the latest Residential Tenancy Branch news items.

2018 News Items

 

Residential tenancy rent increases that take effect in 2019 are allowed to a maximum of 2.5%. (news release date: September 26, 2018).

 
Manufactured home park tenancy rent increases that take effect in 2019 are allowed to a maximum of 2.5% plus a proportional amount. 
 
The Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing is listening to the concerns of renters by cutting the annual allowable rent increase by 2%, limiting it to inflation. This change is an early recommendation from B.C.’s Rental Housing Task Force.
 
Landlords that have already provided notice to their tenants for 2019 are required to completed an updated form with the new rent increase formula and provide notice to tenants.  The landlord 3 months’ notice requirement is not applicable to the updated notice.
 

The Residential Tenancy Branch has published information and resources for landlords and tenants affected by the 2018 Wildfires.

- View 2018 Wildfires and Your Tenancy

- View Frequently Asked Questions for Landlords and Tenants

Canada Post Labour Dispute: Serving Documents

Serving Documents to Other Parties

During the Canada Post labour dispute, you should use other methods of service. Arbitrators may determine that the documents sent by mail were not sufficiently served and dismiss any related applications for dispute resolution, with or without leave to reapply. As a temporary measure during this period, you may use courier for service of documents. The Residential Tenancy Branch has made a special order allowing service of documents by courier.

Canada Post Labour Dispute: Paying Rent

Rent must be paid in full and on time – by midnight on the day it’s due. A landlord may issue a 10 Day Notice to End Tenancy for non-payment of rent if rent is not received on time--even if a cheque has been delayed in the mail. During the period of the Canada Post dispute, you may wish to deliver rent payments to the landlord in person, arrange for an e-Transfer or provide post-dated cheques to ensure payments are received on time. If you use e-Transfer, you are responsible for any related fees and must provide the landlord with a passcode to access the funds.

Canada Post Labour Dispute: Returning Deposits

During the Canada Post labour dispute, landlords must still return the deposit (plus any interest) to the tenant within 15 days after a tenant has moved out and given the landlord a forwarding address in writing except if a tenant agrees in writing to allow the landlord to keep all or part of the deposit or an arbitrator decides that the landlord can keep the deposit. During the Canada Post labour dispute, landlords are advised to use methods of service other than mail. Landlords may want to return the deposit in person or arrange for the tenant to collect the deposit in order to ensure prompt return of the deposit.

As a temporary measure during this period, you may use courier for service of documents. The Residential Tenancy Branch has made a special order allowing service of documents by courier. The sender is responsible for all costs associated with service of documents.

 

 

 

Changes to the Manufactured Home Park Tenancy Act to improve compensation for tenants when manufactured home parks close are in force effective June 6, 2018.

Effective June 6, 2018 important changes to the Manufactured Home Park Tenancy Act came into force. Learn More.

When a landlord gives a 12 month notice to end tenancy:

  1. The tenancy will end 12 months after the 12 months after the notice is given, whether fixed term or periodic. 
  2. A Tenant under a fixed term or periodic tenancy who has received a 12 month notice can end their tenancy early by giving the landlord 10 days’ written notice.
  3. A Landlord must compensate a tenant $20,000 on or before the effective date of the notice.
  4. A Tenant can apply to the Residential Tenancy Branch for additional compensation equal to the difference between the assessed value of the home and $20,000 if:
    1. They are not able to obtain the necessary permits, licenses, approvals or certificates required by law to move the manufactured home or
    2. The tenant is not able to move the manufactured home to another manufactured home site within a reasonable distance of the current manufactured home site; and
    3. The tenant does not owe any tax in relation to the manufactured home.
  5. A landlord may not claim reimbursement from the tenant for the costs of removing, storing, advertising or disposing of the manufactured home if the home cannot be moved in the above circumstances.
  6. A Landlord must compensate a tenant 12 months’ rent or $5000, whichever is greater, (unless excused by an arbitrator in extenuating circumstances) if a manufactured home park is closed to be converted for residential or non-residential use and
    1. steps have not been taken to accomplish the stated purpose for ending the tenancy under section 42 within a reasonable period after the effective date of the notice.
 

British Columbia’s Rental Housing Task Force will tour the province in June 2018, stopping in communities to engage British Columbians.

On May 28, 2018, the Rental Housing Task Force announced the launch of a province wide engagement. 

The task force is leading a review to modernize and balance provincial tenancy laws and policies to provide safe, secure and affordable housing.  The focus will be on both renters and rental housing providers. The public will have the opportunity to provide feedback on a range of issues of importance to them by attending a regional public meeting, making a written submission and sharing their ideas via an online engagement site.

To share your ideas, or for more information on community meeting locations, visit the online engagement site before July 6th at 4pm : https://engage.gov.bc.ca/rentalhousingtaskforce/​

Changes to Residential Tenancy Act to improve security for tenants facing eviction came into force May 17  2018.  

Effective May 17 2018 several important changes to the Residential Tenancy Act came into force. Learn More.

Effective May 17 2018:

  1. Landlords must give four months’ notice to end tenancy for demolition, renovation or repair, or conversion, and tenants have 30 days to dispute the notice,
  2. Compensation is being increased to 12 months’ rent if a landlord (or purchaser) ends a tenancy under section 49 (landlord use) and they don’t (within a reasonable period) take steps to accomplish the purpose for ending the tenancy or use the rental unit for that stated purpose for at least 6 months.
  3. Tenants have a right of first refusal to enter into a new tenancy agreement at a rent determined by the landlord if the landlord ends their tenancy to renovate or repair the rental unit.
  4. A landlord must compensate a tenant 12 months’ rent payable under the tenancy agreement if the tenant exercises a right of first refusal and the landlord does not give the tenant notice and a tenancy agreement to sign.
  5. If a landlord is ending a tenancy on behalf of a purchaser, the notice must contain the purchaser’s name and address.

Changes to the Residential Tenancy Act and Manufactured Home Park Tenancy Act were introduced in the Legislative Assembly on April 12, 2018.

These changes are focused in two key areas:

  • Providing stronger protections for renters affected by demolition, renovation, or conversion of their rental unit.
  • Providing stronger protection for manufactured home park tenants affected by the closure or redevelopment of the park.

The B.C. Government has appointed a Rental Housing Task Force that will advise on how to improve security and fairness for renters and landlords throughout the province.  See the news release for more information.  Further details will be announced when they are available.

 

Changes to the Manufactured Home Park Tenancy Act  (news release date: April 3, 2018) 

Proposed changes to the Manufactured Home Park Tenancy Act announced on April 3, 2018 will increase compensation for owners of manufactured homes affected by a manufactured home park closure. 

Prior to the proposed amendments becoming law, the following rules still apply:

  • Section 42 of the Manufactured Home Park Tenancy Act allows a landlord to end a tenancy agreement, with 12 months’ notice, if they intend in good faith to convert all or a significant part of the manufactured home park to a non-residential use or a residential use other than a manufactured home park.
  • The landlord must have required permits and approvals prior to issuing a notice to end tenancy. 
  • A landlord who is ending a tenancy to convert a manufactured home park must end the tenancy in good faith which means the landlord has honest intentions and no ulterior motive to take advantage of a situation. The landlord must honestly intend to use the site for the purposes stated on the notice to end the tenancy. 
  • Tenants who receive a notice to end tenancy have 15 days to dispute the notice by making an application for dispute resolution
    • A tenant who receives notice before the proposed amendments become law should consider whether the landlord has complied with the Act and if they feel the notice has been issue improperly, may wish to apply for dispute resolution. 

See the 12 Month Notice to End Tenancy for Conversion of Manufactured Home Park web page for more information on the current laws.

The interest rate for deposits is set according to the Residential Tenancy regulation part 1, section 4.

Interest payable on security deposits and pet damage deposits

The rate of interest under section 38 (1) (c) of the Act [return of deposits] that is payable to a tenant on a security deposit or pet damage deposit is 4.5% below the prime lending rate of the principal banker to the Province on the first day of each calendar year, compounded annually.

The current prime lending rate of the principal banker to the Province is 3.20%.

 

2017 News Items

Changes to tenancy laws, including amendments that limit the use of vacate clauses in fixed-term tenancy agreements and that limit rent increases between agreements with the same tenant take effect December 11, 2017 

What changes have been made to B.C.'s tenancy laws?

Changes to the legislation include limiting the use of vacate clauses in new and existing fixed-term tenancy agreements, limiting rent increases between fixed term tenancy agreements with the same tenant, and strengthening the ability of the Residential Tenancy Branch to investigate and levy administrative penalties for serious repeat and deliberate non-compliance with tenancy laws or orders

What  are the changes related to Fixed-Term Tenancies?

A vacate clause requires a tenant to move out on the date the agreement ends.  Landlords will no longer be able to include a “vacate” clause in a fixed-term tenancy agreement except in certain circumstances.  These new rules will apply to both new and existing tenancy agreements.

Unless the landlord and tenant agree to another fixed term, the tenancy will automatically continue as a month-to-month tenancy under the same terms as the original agreement.  This type of tenancy continues until one party serves notice or they both agree to end the tenancy.

In what kind of circumstances will a landlord still be able to use a vacate clause?

Effective December 11, 2017, fixed term tenancy agreements can no longer include a vacate clause requiring a tenant to move out at the end of the term unless: 

 • The tenancy agreement is a sublease agreement; or

• The tenancy is a fixed term tenancy in circumstances prescribed in section 13.1 of the Residential Tenancy Regulation.  This Regulation specifies  situations where a landlord or landlord’s close family member plans in good faith to occupy the rental unit 

The ministry will monitor the use of these provisions, continue to consult with key stakeholders and may add new circumstances as necessary.

What are the changes related to rent increases?

A rent increase for a tenant remaining in a rental unit is limited to the maximum annual allowable amount and can only be increased once every 12 months.  Rent can no longer be increased above that amount between tenancy agreements with the same tenant.  Landlords must provide tenants with three full rental months’ notice of a rent increase and use the approved form. 

Landlords are no longer able to apply for an additional rent increase on the basis that the rent is significantly lower than other similar rental units in the same geographic area.

I have an existing fixed-term tenancy agreement with a vacancy clause. What should I do?

You may want to have a discussion with your tenant or landlord regarding the intended use of the rental unit at the end of the fixed-term. 

If you are a tenant, you will not be required to move out at the end of the term unless you are in a sublease agreement, or the landlord meets the specific circumstances identified in the Residential Tenancy Regulation.  This Regulation specifies a situation where a landlord or a landlord's close family member plans in good faith to occupy the rental unit (for example, if the landlord has rented out their home during an extended absence for work, school or travel but has firm plans to return on a particular date.  

A tenant who wants to move out on the date originally agreed to in the tenancy agreement will need to provide one month written notice to the landlord.  The tenant and landlord may also agree to end the tenancy on the date originally identified as the end of the term.  A mutual agreement to end a tenancy (PDF) must be in writing and agreed to by both parties.

If you are a landlord and you intend to enforce the vacate clause under the specific circumstances identified in the Act or Regulation, you should advise your tenant.  If the tenant doesn't agree in writing to mutually end the tenancy and move out at the end of the term, you will need to apply for an order of possession through the Residential Tenancy Branch.  At the hearing, the onus will be on you to clearly demonstrate to the arbitrator how you meet the allowable circumstances for a vacate clause. 

Are there any other situations where a vacate clause in an existing tenancy agreement can still be enforced?

There are two additional situations involving existing fixed-term tenancy agreements where a vacate clause can still be enforced.  If, before the day the legislative amendments were introduced (October 26, 2017):

  1. A landlord, expecting their tenant to move out at the end of the term, had already entered into a tenancy agreement with a new tenant; or
  2. A landlord was granted an order of possession requiring a tenant to vacate the unit, but the possession order takes effect after December 11, 2017.

What about landlords who have been relying on fixed-term tenancy agreements to protect against bad tenants?

The Residential Tenancy Act is intended to protect both landlord and tenants.  There are options available through the Residential Tenancy Branch to help landlords deal with problem tenants.  It is important that both landlords and tenants know their rights and obligations under the Act.

How can a tenancy end without the vacate clause?

Aside from removing the option to use a vacate clause, the rules around ending a tenancy have not changed.  For example, a tenant can end a tenancy by providing the landlord with at least one rental month written notice.  A Residential Tenancy Branch arbitrator can order the end of a tenancy for a breach of a tenancy agreement by either party.  Landlords and tenants can mutually agree to end a tenancy, which must be documented in writing. A mutual agreement to end a tenancy(PDF) is recommended.  Landlords can also end a tenancy by serving the tenant one of the following notices to end tenancy:

Why are you making these changes?

The B.C. government is committed to doing more to protect renters in B.C.  It is important that tenants have the sense of security they deserve when signing a fixed-term rental lease.  By closing the so-called fixed-term lease loophole, landlords will no longer be able to bypass rent control.

Changes to the Residential Tenancy Act and Manufactured Home Park Tenancy Act were introduced in the Legislative Assembly on October 26, 2017.

These changes are focused in three key areas:

  • Addressing concerns about fixed term tenancies with vacate clauses in residential tenancies
  • Enhancing current provisions related to Administrative Penalties
  • Introducing a new expedited process for the return of security deposits in residential tenancies

As the legislation has just been introduced, staff are developing information on how these changes will affect landlords and tenants in BC. 

Try our new online application for dispute resolution!

  • Upload evidence online
  • Apply for a fee waiver online
  • Helpful email reminders and notifications
  • Helpful information along each step of the application
  • Mobile device friendly
  • Ability to resume an incomplete application
  • Improved look and intuitive design

Learn more now

Note: Applicants wanting to update online applications filed before September 25, 2017 must contact the Residential Tenancy Branch or visit any Service BC Office or Residential Tenancy Branch Office.

Landlords applying through the direct request process for an order of possession and monetary order for unpaid rent may now request recovery of the $100 application filing fee in the application.

 

Scheduled online application outage from September 22, 2017 5:00 p.m. to September 25, 2017 (news release date: September 22, 2017)

The Online Application for Dispute Resolution will be offline from 5:00 on Friday, September 22, 2017.  

During this outage, the Residential Tenancy Branch will be launching our new online application which you should see here soon.  

We hope to bring you the new online application by Monday, September 25, 2017, but if we have difficulties, we will ensure our standard online application is available on Monday.

Coming soon! An improved online application will be available in September. What’s new?

  • Upload evidence online
  • Apply for a fee waiver online
  • Helpful email reminders and notifications
  • Helpful information along each step of the application
  • Mobile device friendly
  • Ability to resume an incomplete application
  • Improved look and intuitive design
Residential tenancy rent increases that take effect in 2018 are allowed to a maximum of 4.0%.
Manufactured home park tenancy rent increases that take effect in 2018 are allowed to a maximum of 4.0% plus a proportional amount.
 

Information session for landlords and tenants in Maple Ridge on Thursday, August 10th (news release date: August 2017)

The information session takes place as follows:

Date:              Thursday, August 10, 2017

Time:             6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Location:      Greg Moore Youth Centre, 11925 Haney Place, Maple Ridge

Get Directions

 

Change to Monetary Claims Limit (news release date: June 1, 2017)

As a result of the recent increase of monetary limit for claims under the Small Claims Act, the Residential Tenancy Branch may now hear disputes that involve a monetary claim of up to $35 000.00.  

The Residential Tenancy Branch adjudicates disputes between landlords and tenants that do not exceed the monetary limit for claims under the Small Claims Act. This authority is provided by section 51 of the Manufactured Home Park Tenancy Act and section 58 of the Residential Tenancy Act.

The monetary limit for claims under the Small Claims Act is increased from $25 000.00 to $35 000.00, effective June 1, 2017.

The 2017 deposit interest rate is 0.0%.

The interest rate for deposits is set according to the Residential Tenancy regulation part 1, section 4.

Interest payable on security deposits and pet damage deposits

4 The rate of interest under section 38 (1) (c) of the Act [return of deposits] that is payable to a tenant on a security deposit or pet damage deposit is 4.5% below the prime lending rate of the principal banker to the Province on the first day of each calendar year, compounded annually.

The current prime lending rate of the principal banker to the Province is 2.70%.

 

2016 News Items

Changes to the Residential Tenancy Act allow landlords to return security and pet deposits electronically to tenants.
 
If a landlord returns a deposit to the tenant by electronic means, they can't charge the tenant a fee for doing so.
Changes to the Residential Tenancy Regulation (External Link) address concerns raised by landlords and tenants.  The changes provide a definition of transitional housing and give housing providers greater ability to ensure safety and security for tenants and staff.  The Regulation changes also allow for the continued and expanded use of rent-geared-to-income housing.
The specific Regulation changes are described below:
  • Section 1 (External Link) is amended to provide a definition of transitional housing that clarifies what kind of housing is considered “transitional” and therefore excluded from the Residential Tenancy Act’s jurisdiction.
  • Section 2 (External Link) is amended to allow existing rent-geared-to-income housing programs to continue after their operating agreements expire, and to allow new rent-geared-to-income housing to be operated under agreements with municipalities or districts.
  • Section 9 of the Schedule (External Link) is amended to support housing providers who serve at-risk populations by providing landlords the authority to make reasonable restrictions on guests’ use of common areas of rental property.  This change also addresses concerns raised by tenants.
Changes to the Residential Tenancy Act allow for the early end to a fixed-term tenancy, commonly known as a lease, by a tenant who is fleeing family violence or who has been accepted into a long-term care facility. This will make it easier for tenants who fear for their or their children’s safety to end the fixed-term tenancy agreement, along with people eligible for, or accepted into, long-term care.
Residential tenancy rent increases that take effect in 2017 are allowed to a maximum of 3.7%.
Manufactured home park tenancy rent increases that take effect in 2017 are allowed to a maximum of 3.7% plus a proportional amount.
Policy Guideline 19: Assignment and Sublet was updated on July 22, 2016.  

The revised policy clarifies how the Residential Tenancy Act applies to sublets.  Roommates who have an agreement with a tenant, but not with the landlord, do not have recourse through the Residential Tenancy Branch as there is no contractual relationship between the roommate and the landlord. 
Tenancy agreements are an important tool to protect both landlords and tenants.

The content on this website is periodically reviewed and updated by the Province of British Columbia as per the date noted on each page: September 26, 2018 .

Contact the Residential Tenancy Branch