Community Economic Recovery Infrastructure Program



The Community Economic Recovery Infrastructure Program provides fully-funded provincial grants to support economic resilience, tourism, heritage, and urban and rural economic development projects in communities impacted by COVID-19.

Last updated: October 1, 2020

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How the program works

Under the Community Economic Recovery Infrastructure Program (CERIP), the Province is committing up to $90 million to support community economic resilience, tourism, heritage, and urban and rural economic development projects. 

The projects will help communities impacted by COVID-19 and support B.C.'s post-pandemic economic recovery.

Eligible applicants can receive a one-time, 100% funded provincial grant to support four key streams:

  • Community Economic Resilience
  • Destination Development
  • Unique Heritage Infrastructure
  • Rural Economic Recovery

Review each stream for specific funding cap information. All funds will be paid out by March 31, 2021. Projects must start by December 31, 2021 and end by March 31, 2023. 


Program funding

Applicants must be prepared to finance all costs over and above the grant amount, including cost overruns, ineligible/eligible costs, ongoing maintenance and operating costs associated with the operations of the completed project. 

Successful applicants will receive the one-time grant payment after signing the contribution agreement. The agreement must be signed by March 31, 2021.

Project funding streams

The Community Economic Resilience (CER) funding stream is focused on short-term and small scale infrastructure projects, such as:

  • Revitalizing outdoor recreation, parks, washrooms and downtown areas
  • Accessing additional space for social distancing
  • Improving emergency preparedness 
  • Upgrading public buildings

Proposed projects must be created with the following economic recovery objectives in mind: 

  • Initial job creation in the construction industry
  • Job creation that supports other areas of the community impacted by COVID-19, like local retail and services

The CER funding stream has up to $30 million to distribute among successful applicants. Applicants can receive a grant up to a maximum of $1 million. CER projects must be outcome-based, targeted, time bound and transparent.

Project examples

Project: Community Trail Improvements

Estimated cost: $165,000

Description: Expand an existing one-way community trail. Due to COVID-19 and the closure of a local recreation centre, trail usage has increased. The project would create a trail loop so all users can maintain social distancing. 


Project: Outdoor Meeting Space 

Estimated cost: $275,000

Description: Create a new outdoor space to host events, public markets, town meeting and music in the square nights. The current outdoor space is too small to accommodate social distancing. The new space will allow the community to meet and maintain social distancing in a safe manner.


Please review critical requirements in the CERIP Program Guide.

The Destination Development (DD) funding stream is focused on projects that bring visitors back to B.C. communities, such as:

  • New or enhanced tourism infrastructure and attractions to attract visitors, including:
    • Interpretive, cultural or tourism welcome centres
    • Tourism causeways
    • Construction of destination trails
    • Event facilities
    • Pivoting mountain resorts to all season destinations
  • Tourism products and amenities that improve the visitor experience, including:
    • Wayfinding, interpretive and First Nations signage
    • Washroom facilities, lighted pathways, and accessibility improvements
    • Seasonal adaptation and expansion projects
  • Tourism adaptation projects that help facilities adjust to COVID-19 protocols, including:
    • Patio expansion
    • Staff accommodation modifications
    • Enhancement of gathering spaces
    • Plexiglass installations
    • Touch free modifications

Proposed projects must be created with the following economic recovery objectives in mind:

  • Shovel-ready projects that can be expedited
  • Provides job opportunities and immediate stimulus
  • Strengthens the destination offering to elevate B.C’.s competitiveness and reputation as a ‘must visit’ travel destination
  • Supports B.C.'s 19 destination development local areas plans
  • Increases the capacity of tourism destinations to welcome visitors, including adjusting to COVID-19 protocols

The DD funding stream has up to $20 million to distribute among successful applicants. Applicants can receive a grant up to a maximum of $1 million. DD projects must be outcome-based, targeted, time bound and transparent.

Project examples

Project: Community Gateway 

Estimated cost: $120,000

Description: Installation of new visitor amenities (public washrooms, visitor information, EV charging station, public art) at a community gateway. The project would help draw visitors to the community, improve their welcome experience and provide additional amenities to support social distancing protocols.


Project: Mountain Resort Adaptation

Estimated cost: $500,000

Description: Installation of outdoor infrastructure and provision at a mountain resort. The current indoor space is too small to accommodate social distancing. The project would allow the resort to meet COVID-19 protocols and expand visitor capacity during the peak ski season, as well as expand outdoor gathering space in shoulder seasons.        


Please review critical requirements in the CERIP Program Guide.

The Unique Heritage Infrastructure (UHI) funding stream is focused on projects that conserve, repair, rehabilitate or develop cultural heritage infrastructure, such as:

  • Heritage structures, cultural heritage sites, landscapes or trails
  • Facilities that support the safeguarding and transmission of history and/or cultural heritage knowledge and practices or traditional trades and crafts
  • Facilities that support cultural heritage documentary history research
  • Facilities that house and safeguard cultural heritage materials and belongings, including repatriated Indigenous materials

Proposed projects must be created with the following economic recovery objectives in mind: 

  • Sustain heritage places for communities and visitors while supporting the transmission of knowledge and specialized skills of cultural heritage
  • Create employment for people associated with the stewardship of cultural heritage
  • Create opportunities for Indigenous communities to protect, learn about, share and revitalize Indigenous cultural heritage, including the preservation, housing and showcasing of Indigenous cultural heritage materials and cultural knowledge and practices
  • Recognize Indigenous peoples as the stewards of their cultural heritage, including positioning the First Peoples’ Cultural Council as the lead agency for Indigenous applicants

The UHI funding stream has up to $20 million to distribute among successful applicants. Applicants may receive a grant up to a maximum of $1 million. UHI projects must be completed within two years.

Project examples

Project: Historic Building and Landscape Upgrades

Estimated cost: $125,000

Description: Recreate a historic kitchen garden, undertake roof repairs and upgrade visitor washrooms at a historic house that is operated as a community museum and learning centre. The project would support local food security and public programming, while ensuring the ongoing conservation of the heritage place. 


Project: Indigenous Cultural Centre Improvements

Estimated cost: $250,000

Description: Improve a facility that houses Indigenous material and culture in order to improve storage and conservation services. The project would support the capacity of the First Nation to care for repatriated materials that are significant for the transmission of community cultural knowledge and practices. 


Additional Information for UHI Applicants

Indigenous Applicants

Indigenous applicants are not required to apply through the Local Government Information System.

Other Applicants

Please review critical requirements in the CERIP Program Guide.

The Rural Economic Recovery (RER) funding stream is focused on helping rural Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities accelerate their recovery from COVID-19 through community-led projects, such as:

  • Building necessary infrastructure to support local industries, diversify and attract new investment
  • Supporting the retention and expansion of existing local businesses
  • Identifying local or regional economic recovery needs and required responses

Proposed projects must be created with the following economic recovery objectives in mind:

  • Develop/expand infrastructure to support business growth for key rural economic sectors such as agriculture, natural resource development, and technology development
  • Assist rural businesses in adapting to the post-COVID landscape by redefining delivery mechanisms, increasing e-commerce, and developing new business opportunities
  • Bring together key stakeholders to identify solutions and opportunities in the current economic situation

The RER funding stream has up to $20 million to distribute among successful applicants. Applicants can receive a grant up to a maximum of $1 million.

Project examples

Project: Industrial Park Improvements

Estimated Cost: $300,000

Description: Completing necessary improvements to an existing industrial park, such as the provision of three-phase power or improved access. Improvements support existing business and will attract new investment. The project will create immediate employment through the construction phase and a legacy asset to support future economic growth.


Project: Creation of Local Abattoir

Estimated Cost: $250,000

Description: Completing the design and construction of a small-scale abattoir to provide processing services to support the local meat industry. The completed facility will reduce processing delays, increase efficiency and productivity for local producers, and create jobs for the local economy.


Please review critical requirements in the CERIP Program Guide.

 


Determine your eligibility

You must meet both project and organization requirements. 

Project eligibility

To be eligible for funding, a project must:

  • Be for public use and benefit, and be for construction, development, economic investment, or cultural heritage works
  • Start construction in 2021
  • Meet all applicable impact assessment, provincial health or environmental legislation and standards
    • Please note: These may require permits or approvals from relevant agencies
  • Meet specific outcomes of the selected project funding stream:
    • Community Economic Resilience
    • Destination Development
    • Unique Heritage Infrastructure
    • Rural Economic Recovery

Applicant eligibility

A local government established by or under British Columbia statute that is one of the following:

  • An incorporated municipality
  • A regional district applying for a community, where a community, for the purpose of application to the program, is a settlement area within a regional district electoral area
    • A community’s boundaries may also coincide with a service area boundary (existing or proposed)

An Indigenous Ultimate Recipient that is one of the following:

  • A band council within the meaning of section 2 of the Indian Act
  • An Indigenous development corporation
  • A First Nation, Inuit or Métis government or authority established pursuant to a self-government agreement or a comprehensive land claim agreement between Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada and an Indigenous people of Canada, that has been approved, given effect and declared valid by federal legislation
  • A First Nation, Inuit or Métis government that is established by or under legislation whether federal or provincial that incorporates a governance structure
  • A not-for-profit organization whose central mandate is to improve Indigenous outcomes, working in collaboration with one or more of the Indigenous entities referred to above, a local government, or British Columbia

A not-for-profit organization that is:

  • An organization incorporated as a not-for-profit corporation or society formed under an Act of Canada or the Province of BC and in good standing under the relevant Act

Application requirements

  • Eligible applicants can only submit two applications
  • All applications must be submitted through the Local Government Information System (LGIS) with the exception of Indigenous applicants applying through the Unique Heritage Infrastructure stream
  • Applications will not be reviewed unless all necessary information and mandatory documentation is provided

A Business BCeID account is required to access the Local Government Information System.

  • The registration process can take up to 15 business days
  • New users are encouraged to start the process as early as possible
  • We recommend applying for a BCeID no later than October 1 to meet the CERIP application deadline

Register for a Business BCeID


Submit your application

All applications must be received by October 29, 2020 at 11:59 pm. Successful applicants will be contacted by early winter of 2020/21.

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