Types of Sentences

When sentencing, the judge has a range of sentencing options. This section describes some of the community and custody sentences you could receive.

The judge must consider all other reasonable options (alternatives to custody) before sentencing you to a custodial sentence. See Alternatives to Custody for more information.

Sentencing Options

The judge can use one or more of these sentencing options: 

  • Reprimand, which is a warning by the judge
  • Absolute discharge, which means you will not receive any further punishment if it is considered in the your best interest and not against the public interest
  • Conditional discharge, where you will have to fulfill certain conditions for a period of time and may require supervision by a youth probation officer
  • a fine up to $1,000, which must be paid at the time, and in the way, the court orders
  • Compensation – or paying back – the loss of or damage to property or for loss of income or support
  • Restitution, where you must replace or return stolen or damaged property
  • Community service work or work specifically for the victim of crime
  • Probation with specific conditions, for up to two years
  • Intensive support and supervision order, which means you will be under the supervision of a youth probation officer and will also work with an assigned youth worker
  • Deferred custody and supervision order, which means you will serve your custody sentence in the community under supervision (with strict conditions). You could be immediately returned to custody if you do not follow these conditions
  • Custody followed by supervision in the community which means you will serve your custody sentence at a youth custody centre, followed by supervision in the community for a specified period of time
  • Intensive rehabilitative custody and supervision (IRCS) order, which is available only for very serious, violent offences and provides greater opportunities to participate in programs aimed at rehabilitation while in custody and while serving the community part of your sentence

You are able to live in the community if you’ve been sentenced to community supervision. This is usually under the supervision of a youth probation officer or other responsible adult. In most cases, there are several conditions you must follow as part of the sentence.

Adult - Types of Sentences

See Understanding Your Sentence (Adult Offenders) for information about types of sentences for adults.

You are able to live in the community if you’ve been sentenced to community supervision. This is usually under the supervision of a youth probation officer or other responsible adult. In most cases, there are several you must follow as part of the sentence.