BCAB #1314 - Application of Taper-Sawn Shakes, Articles 9.26.9.6 & 9.26.10.2

July 14, 1993

BCAB #1314

Re: Application of Taper-Sawn Shakes, Articles 9.26.9.6 & 9.26.10.2

Project Description

This appeal deals with the installation of taper-sawn red cedar shakes on a number of single family dwellings. The appellant represents a number of roofers who have installed taper-sawn shake roofs that have been rejected by the building official.

Reason for Appeal

Sentence 9.26.9.6.(2) permits taper-sawn shakes to be installed without interlay if they are installed in accordance with the exposure table for cedar shingles, Table 9.26.9.A.

Appellant's Position

The appellant contends that the code is not clear with regards to taper-sawn shakes installed with an exposure greater than listed in Table 9.26.9.A. The taper-sawn shakes in question are 450 mm long No. 1 grade laid on roof slopes greater than 1 in 3 with an exposure of about 185 mm or 45 mm more than Table 9.26.9.A. permits. The appellant states that this is the current standard practice in the industry and considers the approximately two and a half plies of No. 15 asphalt saturated felt installed under the taper-sawn shakes to be acceptable underlay.

Building Official's Position

The building official maintains that if the exposure of the taper-sawn shakes exceeds the limits of Table 9.26.9.A. they must be installed with interlay as required by Article 9.26.10.1. Several previous appeals and recommended practices from the RCABC Roofing Practices Manual are referred to as evidence in support of their interpretation.

Appeal Board Decision #1314

It is the determination of the Board that the previous appeals dealing with the installation of taper-sawn shakes, #558, #1085 & # 1123, are still valid. As such, shakes must be installed in conformance with either the shake requirements or the shingle requirements but they cannot be installed using a mixture of these requirements. Taper-sawn shakes must be laid with the exposure required for shingles if an interlay is not used.

George R. Humphrey, Chair