B.C. Agricultural Fencing Handbook

Fencing designs are provided for crop protection, livestock control and special fence designs.

The B.C. Agricultural Fencing Handbook is a collection of factsheets that discusses the fence planning process, fence materials, fence construction and bracing. Electric fencing and gate construction is also described.

Fence Planning

Fences should be planned as part of an overall system for a farm or ranch.  A fence is a management tool which will be most successful when properly planned.

Fence Materials

Fences installed on agricultural land in B.C. are either non-electric or electric and are mostly constructed of wood and steel strand wire or steel woven wire.

Fence Construction

Brace Assemblies for Wire Fences

When constructing fences of tensioned wire, braces are required to provide support for the wire. They are the anchor for the fence.

Crop Protection & Special Fence Designs

Wildlife fencing is installed to protect crops and livestock from damage. An easy exit is required in the form of a one-way gate to release the animals from the farm, ranch or orchard, but do not allow entry.

Livestock Control Fence Designs

The majority of non-electric agricultural fences constructed in B.C. are cattle fences either around hay fields, pastures or rangeland. These fences control a variety of cattle including range bulls, pasture cows, cows with small calves and large breeds under conditions from native range to irrigated pasture.

Electric Fencing

Electric fences are commonly used in agriculture. Whereas standard fences are constructed to form a physical barrier, electric fences are constructed to form a psychological or mental barrier. The mental barrier is accomplished by introducing an electric shock through the fence wire which repels the animal from the fence.

Gates

A gate may regulate movement of people, wildlife, machinery and livestock. Gates may be constructed of metal, wire, wood or a combination of these materials.