Types of Documents That Can be Authenticated

Government of British Columbia Documents

  • B.C. government documents issued by the Vital Statistics Agency after 1985, such as original (long-form) birth certificates, death certificates, marriage certificates, marriage licenses, marriage search certificates or Supreme Court documents (divorce), may be sent directly to the OIC Administration Office for authentication.
  • The government office that holds an original government document (such as the Supreme Court or the registrar of companies) can provide you with a certified true copy of an original document. These documents can be sent directly to the OIC Administration Office for authentication.  Corporate Registry/BC Registry Services/Registrar of Companies documentation obtained online that does not bear the Registrar’s seal imprint should be accompanied by the online receipt or be notarized.
  • Wallet-sized and plasticized certificates cannot be authenticated. Photocopies of any of these documents, unless notarized (see below), cannot be authenticated.

Educational Documents

  • The following educational documents can be authenticated:
    • A secondary school graduation certificate from a public school, signed by the superintendent of the applicable school district
    • A secondary school graduation certificate from an independent school, signed by the inspector of independent schools
    • A Grade 11 or 12 transcript issued by the Ministry of Education, and
    • A transcript issued by a public post-secondary institution and signed by the registrar of the institution.
  • Documents issued by private educational institutions, such as language schools, cannot be authenticated unless they are notarized (certified as true copies) by a B.C. lawyer or B.C. notary public.

Documents Notarized by a B.C. Lawyer or B.C. Notary Public

  • Original documents may be taken to a lawyer or notary public to be notarized. The signature of the lawyer or notary public can be authenticated by the OIC Administration Office.
  • Photocopies of original documents can be authenticated, but only after they have been notarized by a lawyer or notary public. The office can then authenticate the signature of the lawyer or notary public.
  • After a lawyer or notary public notarizes documents, such as statutory declarations and powers of attorney, the OIC Administration Office can authenticate the signature of the lawyer or notary public.

Note: Police criminal record checks must be notarized, originals cannot be authenticated.