Parkinson's Disease

About Parkinson's Disease


Excerpt from HealthLink BC:

Parkinson's disease affects the way you move. It happens when there is a problem with certain nerve cells in the brain.
 
Normally, these nerve cells make an important chemical called dopamine. Dopamine sends signals to the part of your brain that controls movement. It lets your muscles move smoothly and do what you want them to do. When you have Parkinson’s, these nerve cells break down. Then you no longer have enough dopamine, and you have trouble moving the way you want to.
 
Parkinson’s is progressive, which means it gets worse over time. But usually this happens slowly, over a period of many years. And there are good treatments that can help you live a full life.

Learn more at:

Helpful Organizations and Information

Parkinson Society of British Columbia

Parkinson Society British Columbia is a not-for-profit charitable organization that exists to address the personal and social consequences of Parkinson's disease through education, community outreach, scientific research, advocacy and public awareness.
The average age for diagnosis with Parkinson’s is 60 years. Seniors who want to learn more about diagnosis, treatment, and living with Parkinson’s can visit: