Red, Blue & Yellow Lists

Based on their conservation status rank, each species and ecosystem is assigned to the red, blue or yellow list to help set conservation priorities and provide a simplified view of the status of B.C.'s species and ecosystems.

These lists also help to identify species and ecosystems that can be considered for designation as "Endangered" or "Threatened."

There are a number of factors used in assessing the conservation status of ecological communities or species. The CDC assigns each one to the red, blue or yellow list based on their conservation status rank – a code that identifies the level of concern about their risk.

Species that are exotic (non-native) or accidental are not assigned a status rank and are not placed on the lists.

Any species or ecosystem that is at risk of being lost (extirpated, endangered or threatened)

Status Ranks Element Types
Animals and plants SX, SH, S1, S1S2, S2, S2?, S1S3
Ecological communities SX, SH, S1, S1S2, S2

Any species or ecosystem that is of special concern

Status Ranks Element Types
Animals S2S3, S2S4, S3, S3? S3S4, S3S5
Plants S2S3, S2S4, S3, S3?
Ecological communities S2S3, S3

Any species or ecosystem that is at the least risk of being lost

Status Ranks Element Types
Animals and plants S4,S4?,S4S5, S5
Ecological communities S3S4, S3S5, S4,. S4S5, S5

 

Find out about how the red and blue lists were developed:

  • Harper, B., S. Cannings, D. Fraser and W.T. Munro. 1994. Provincial lists of species at risk. Pp. 16-23 in Biodiversity in British Columbia. L.E. Harding and E. McCullum (eds.), Canadian Wildlife Service, Delta, B.C.