Employee Engagement & Organizational Performance

Citizen Service & Employee Engagement

Explore how employee engagement and public sector frontline service satisfaction are closely related.
 

This report aims to provide further understanding of frontline service workers by establishing a baseline by which frontline service workers are defined, as well as their current work environment perceptions. Comparison of responses to the questions within the Work Environment Survey (WES 2010) was conducted between different types of service workers and non-service workers.

The proposed set of linkages that form the Public Sector Service Value Chain (a two-way relationship between employee engagement and customer satisfaction) had been analyzed. The objective of the current study is to replicate the findings and delve deeper into specific aspects of employee engagement through two key research questions. (1) Can the findings from the previous study between employee engagement and customer satisfaction be replicated? (2) Which of the three employee engagement measures (organization satisfaction, job satisfaction, BC Public Service commitment) most impacts customer satisfaction, and how?

This study predates the 2009 report Public Sector Service Value Chain Revisiting the First Link with BC Public Service Work Units as BC Stat’s first exploration into linking employee engagement and customer satisfaction. While the 2009 report calls questions the strength of the link found in this report and similar studies conducted in other jurisdictions, both do find a marked link between employee engagement and customer satisfaction.

 

Engagement Over Time

Take a look at how engagement has changed over time within the BC Public Service, including engagement migration patterns that have been observed over the years.

The BC Public Service strives to understand and address the engagement of their employees via feedback on four questions in the annual Work Environment Survey (WES). Based on responses to these questions, engagement can be assessed through the grouping of employees according to one of four different states of engagement: engaged, disengaged, happily detached, and unhappily dedicated. This report looks at trends in employee migration between engagement states from 2010 to 2011.

The BC Public Service strives to understand and address the engagement of their employees via feedback on four questions in the annual Work Environment Survey (WES). Based on responses to these questions, engagement can be assessed through the grouping of employees according to one of four different states of engagement: engaged, disengaged, happily detached, and unhappily dedicated. This report looks at trends in employee migration between engagement states from 2008 to 2009.

The BC Public Service strives to understand and address the engagement of their employees via feedback on four questions in the annual Work Environment Survey (WES). Based on responses to these questions, engagement can be assessed through the grouping of employees according to one of four different states of engagement: engaged, disengaged, happily detached, and unhappily dedicated. This report looks at trends in employee migration between engagement states from 2007 to 2008.

Employees newly hired into the BC Public Service are one of the more at-risk streams for retention. To explore this, BC Stats conducted an exploratory, cross-sectional cohort study using 2008 Work Environment Survey (WES) data collected from 18,483 regular employees at different time frames since they were hired.

Based on employee responses to the Work Environment Survey (WES) from 2007 to 2008, most government organizations saw an increase in the total number of engaged respondents in their organization. This report explores whether increases are a reflection of actual improvement or whether they are due to fluctuations in the survey sample and organizational change.

 

Organizational Performance

Take a closer look at how engagement is tied to organizational performance and productivity.

This report explores characteristics and perspectives that are unique to highly engaged work units. The focus of the research centres on a comparative analysis between employees in highly engaged work units, and those found throughout the remainder of the BC Public Service. Included in these comparisons is a demographic profile which is used to delve further into the variation of engagement levels. Supplementing these comparisons is a detailed qualitative analysis, which adds a critical layer of context to the quantitative findings.

Productivity in the public sector is difficult, if not impossible to measure directly since external outputs are often intangible in the absence of financial returns. The diversity of service outputs across BC Public Service organizations poses a greater challenge. As a result, BC Stats decided to ask employees directly about their opinions of productivity to gain a better understanding of the behaviors, attitudes and experiences that could be influencing productivity; this study explores the findings from a random sample of 1163 WES respondents in 2007.

This Business Indicators newsletter provides an overview of the findings of the report described above, Defining Productivity in the BC Public Service.

This report investigates whether an employee’s level of engagement has an effect on the amount of sick time he/she may use. It was found that although a more engaged employee may use less sick time, the impact of engagement on the amount of sick time used is fairly marginal.

 

Other Research

Compare engagement results both within the BC Public Service, the B.C. labour force and beyond.

This study, based on a survey of the employed labour force in B.C., explores employee engagement in workplaces across the province to determine the level of engagement in the employed labour force and to better understand the factors that influence engagement.

This Business Indicators article highlights the findings of a study that explores data from a random sample of 2,004 British Columbians collected in 2008 covering a broad cross-section of the employed labour force aged 18 years and over. Respondents were asked questions about their work environment experiences as well as their overall engagement levels (i.e., job and organization satisfaction as well as commitment).