Natural Resource Sector Careers

Whether you are a recent graduate or looking to enter the BC Public Service mid-career, B.C.’s north is a great place to develop your career in the natural resource sector. Our employees in the north have excellent opportunities to take on increasing responsibility and get exposure to a wide array of work experiences.

Explore "what a day in the work-life looks like" for some of the employees of the Ministry of Forest, Lands and Natural Resource Operations in B.C.’s north.  

 

You will provide insight and creative solutions to different sectors to ensure the delivery of a consistent message to First Nations and proponents.

First Nations Relations Adviser (STO R24 Res) – What a day in your work-life looks like

Job overview:

The First Nations Relations Adviser reviews proposals for the use of natural resources on Crown Land and determines the impact on First Nations identified or potential traditional use areas. You plan and lead the facilitation of the First Nations consultation process and ensure legal obligations have been met. You find creative solutions to a problem where all parties benefit in some way. This position is a recommending authority on whether proposed work should proceed.

As a First Nations Relations Adviser, you will work primarily independently, but rely on the expertise of co-workers, and communicate across different sectors and ministries. You will provide insight and creative solutions to different sectors to ensure the delivery of a consistent message to First Nations and proponents. The majority of your time will be spent in the office but you will have the opportunity to travel between offices and to visit work sites. In the summer there are opportunities to go out in the field, and you may hop on a helicopter once or twice! There will be many projects to be worked on at the same time; there is always something new to initiate and several consultations take place at once. Although this can be stressful, it provides variety and you will be able to leave your work at work.

There are always opportunities for career development. On-the-job training in GIS mapping, helicopter safety, first aid, and aboriginal law is available.

Tips from other staff:

  • Spend some time with case law during your first few weeks. It will pay dividends later on when you have a lot of files on the go
  • Lots of opportunities to learn on the job! Try to learn the acronyms as soon as possible

 

 
 Land and Resource Coordinator

The Land and Resource Coordinator and team support any work area that could benefit from project management and expertise by leading technical analysis and options development, process facilitation, and stakeholder engagement.

Land & Resource Coordinator – What a day in your work-life looks like

Job overview:

The Land and Resource Coordinators play a large role in project management and coordination. They work on leading resource management drivers that touch on First Nations and wildlife management, ecosystem and habitat conservation, natural resources research, geospatial analysis, policy analyses and cumulative effects. The Land and Resource Coordinator and team support any work area that could benefit from project management and expertise by leading technical analysis and options development, process facilitation, and stakeholder engagement. With changing and emerging government priorities it is very interesting to be part of the emerging, leading edge, and strategically important initiatives of the organization.

As the Land and Resource Coordinator, you will work primarily in a team environment of various expertise to outline a project plan, followed by working primarily independently on tasks needed to move the project forward. There are usually two to three projects going on at one time, allowing some variety throughout your day. Most of your time is spent in the office; however there may be opportunities to conduct field work and attend meetings or seminars across the province. You will be able to leave your work tasks at work, and experience a work-life balance.

There are opportunities to build your career by working on various projects and participating in training. Training can include conflict resolution, facilitation, project management, ArcGIS, and many others.

Tips from other staff:

  • Make sure you take the time to implement a good time management strategy
  • There is a very collaborative work environment, with the need to be able to plan, prioritize and complete tasks independently to ensure the project succeeds

The Resource Technologist/Resource Technician conducts data gathering, investigation, and technical evaluation of physical evidence to analyse and interpret, draw conclusions, and make recommendations.

Resource Technologist/Resource Technician – What a day in your work-life looks like

Job overview:

The Resource Technologist/Resource Technician provides a range of technical evaluation and advisory services to support decisions on the use of natural resources, and the achievement of resource management objectives. The Resource Technologist/Resource Technician conducts data gathering, investigation, and technical evaluation of physical evidence to analyze and interpret, draw conclusions, and make recommendations.

As a Resource Technologist, you will primarily work independently on projects while being a part of a larger team. Your time will be managed between both the field and office, but more time may be spent in the office in the winter months. There will be many projects to be worked on at the same time which provide variety to the job. There is an ability to work with diverse groups within the organization, and opportunities to provide expertise to other teams and programs. This job allows you to leave work tasks at work.

There are opportunities to travel for training and management is receptive to training requests.

Tips from other staff:

  • I didn’t expect the complexity of time management in the job. Managing and dealing with the clients expectation has been an enjoyable part of the job

The majority of your time will be in the office; however, in the summer months field work may dominate your time.

Stewardship Forester (LSO 2) – What a day in your work-life looks like

Job overview:

The Stewardship Forester provides professional advisory services to a program area in the natural resource sector.  A typical day may include: planning a program of resource stewardship monitoring, meeting with Wildlife Service staff to update a fire management plan, reviewing and providing comments to another agency on a proposed development, reviewing stocking standards to assist tenures staff, or preparing data for a timber supply review.

As a Stewardship Forester, you will work both in a team and independently. Individual work is completed in consideration with the rest of the team and you will often collaborate with others. The majority of your time will be in the office, however in the summer months, field work may dominate your time. Several projects may be worked on at once, and you will be able to leave your work at work.

There are many opportunities for administrative, communications, and systems training through in house courses and online training. Professional development opportunities also exist. Temporary assignments and field trips also allow for career development.

Tips from other staff:

  • Take anthropology courses and conflict negotiation. This will help in First Nations consultations. The majority of a team’s effort is allocated to working with First Nations
  • Be flexible. Sometimes priorities change and you will have to shift your focus onto a different project
  • Physical fitness and stamina are needed for field days, since weather and terrain are variable, and the days can be long

As a Tenures Forester/Licensed Authorizations Officer, you will draw input, knowledge, and experience from a small team on a daily basis while you work independently on tasks and assigning priorities.

Tenures Forester/Licensed Authorizations Officer (LSO 2)What a day in your work-life looks like

Job Overview:

The Tenures Forester/Licensed Authorizations Officer is responsible for reviewing and providing advisory services on forest tenure agreements, management plans, woodlot license plans, license replacement offer preparation, and forest stewardship plan reviews. There is an on-going need to access, synthesize, distill and summarize varied data and information.

As a Tenures Forester/Licensed Authorizations Officer, you will draw input, knowledge, and experience from a small team on a daily basis while you work independently on tasks and assigning priorities. The majority of your time is in the office, although there are opportunities to participate in the field. There are many small projects going on at one time and it is often necessary to pause a project at a logical point and pick up another; this results in a range of projects being worked on simultaneously that need to be tracked and prioritized. You will be able to leave work tasks at work as part of a healthy and effective work/life balance.

There are many opportunities for career development and advancement. Training that does not require travel and out-of-town accommodation is quite readily accessible.

Tips from other staff:

  • There is a highly socially interactive nature of the job in terms of frequent and varied meetings with public colleagues. It’s easy if you’re comfortable in a social environment